jointure

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jointure

provision made by a husband for his wife by settling property upon her at marriage for her use after his death or the property so settled.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

JOINTURE, estates.. A competent livelihood of freehold for the wife, of lands and tenements; to take effect in profit or possession, presently after the death of the husband, for the life of the wife at least.
     2. Jointures are regulated by the statute of 27 Hen. VIII. o. 10, commonly called the statute of uses.
     3. To make a good jointure, the following circumstances must concur, namely; 1. It must take effect, in possession or profit, immediately from the death of the husband. 2. It must be for the wife's life, or for some greater estate. 3. It must be limited to the wife herself, and not to any other person in trust for her. 4. It must be made in satisfaction for the wife's whole dower, and not of part of it only. 5. The estate limited to the wife must be expressed or averred to be, in satisfaction of her whole dower. 6. It must be made before marriage. A jointure attended with all these circumstances is binding on the widow, and is a complete bar to the claim of dower; or rather it prevents its ever arising. But there are other. modes of limiting an estate to a wife, which, Lord Coke says, are good jointures within the statute, provided the wife accepts of them after the death of the husband. She may, however, reject them, and claim her dower. Cruise, Dig. tit. 7; 2 Bl. Com. 137; Perk. h.t. In its more enlarged sense, a jointure signifies a joint estate, limited to both husband and. wife. 2 131. Com. 137. Vide 14 Vin. Ab. 540; Bac. Ab. h.t.; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1761, et seq.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Questions of property had always featured in marriage negotiations, but the shift from universal dower to individual jointures and to arranging property flows at marriage rather than death, facilitated the jockeying in the play over portions and jointures.
The other change was that property arrangements between generations were less often determined at death, through primogeniture, dower, or a will, and more commonly established at marriage through the arrangement of a jointure, trust, or entail.
(1) Marriage contracts could include jointures, which the widow disposed of as she saw fit.
Contracts ensured women some part, in the form of allowances or pin money, of the wealth they brought to a family, and jointures offered them some financial resources in case of widowhood, keeping the women solvent and enabling them to avoid demanding funds from the family they married out of or into.
The unmarried and widows often engaged in litigation related to marriage settlements, jointures, uses and trusts.
On the one hand, Cook offers these contemporary sources as points of departure for examining Shakespeare's plays; thus in a chapter on 'Dowries and Jointures', she writes that 'without a grasp of the social codes involved, it is impossible to see subtleties in Shakespeare's treatment of this vital aspect of wooing'.
In adopting measures for the preservation of property in the wake of the Luddite Riots, the Derbyshire Insurrection, the Spa Fields Meeting, and the March of the Blanketeers against the alleged designs of Jacobins and Radicals, owners and landlords are equating landed and political power as analogous jointures when in fact they have long ceased to be in symbiosis.
O'Day argues that Cassandra Brydges was representative of the active roles such women played in managing their own monies, often by the careful investment of inheritances, jointures, or marriage settlements.
Doppelt's oeuvre ranges from alluring juxtapositions of food particles to bizarre jointures of architectural detail.
For example, in these plays she notices the prominence of young grooms inheriting volatile fee simple estates and the comparative lack of jointure bargains.
Based on the experiences of her evidential sample, Wilson echoes the argument of Eileen Spring that the replacement of the common law dower arrangement with the jointure (which was integral to the strict settlement that the law of equity supported) disadvantaged women.