Journal

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Journal

A book or log in which entries are made to record events on a daily basis. A book where transactions or events are recorded as they occur.

A legislative journal is kept by the clerk and is a daily record of the legislative proceedings. Typical entries include actions taken by various committees and a chronological accounting of bills introduced on the floor.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

JOURNAL, mar. law. The book kept on board of a ship or other vessel, which contains an account of the ship's course, with a short history of every occurrence during the voyage. Another name for logbook. (q.v.) Chit. Law of Nat. 199.

JOURNAL, common law. A book used among merchants, in which the contents of the waste-book are separated every month, and entered on the debtor and creditor side, for more convenient posting in the ledger.

JOURNAL, legislation. An account of the proceedings of a legislative body.
     2. The Constitution of the United States, art. 1, s. 5, directs that "each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings; and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may, in their judgment, require secrecy." Vide 2 Story, Const., 301.
     3. The constitutions of the several states contain similar provisions.
     4. The journal of either house is evidence of the action of that house upon all matters before it. 7 Cowen, R. 613 Cowp. 17.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
The Journalist tried to relieve the tension by telling anecdotes of Hettie Potter.
Most of us hearers were in shadow, for the candles in the smoking-room had not been lighted, and only the face of the Journalist and the legs of the Silent Man from the knees downward were illuminated.
"An obscure--incredible, unfathomable, inexplicable affair--and there is only one thing I fear, Monsieur Rouletabille,--that the journalists will be trying to explain it."
"Not I!--I like the press and journalists too well to be in any way disagreeable to them; but Monsieur Stangerson has given orders for his door to be closed against everybody, and it is well guarded.
I know it is the practice of journalists to put the end of the story at the beginning and call it a headline.
"Reported by a journalist for the amusement of the civilized Europe," he broke in scornfully.
Milton and Dryden were really journalists; Milton when he wrote his political pamphlets, and Dryden when he wrote Absalom and Achitophel and other poems of that kind.
It was a very simple-hearted fraud, and it was all done with an innocent trust in the popular ignorance which now seems to me a little pathetic; but it was certainly very barefaced, and merited the public punishment which the discoverer inflicted by means of what journalists call the deadly parallel column.
At the opera he talked with journalists, for he stood high in their favor; a perpetual exchange of little services went on between them; he poured into their ears his misleading news and swallowed theirs; he prevented them from attacking this or that minister on such or such a matter, on the plea that it would cause real pain to their wives or their mistresses.
Consequently, he was much liked in the world of actors and actresses, journalists and artists.
LAHORE -- Prime Minister Imran Khan on Monday abruptly cancelled a meeting with senior journalists at Governor House, drawing criticism from different journalist organisations.
On the occasion, Mahmood Khan said said that the sacrifices of the journalist community for the promotion of democratic values and the protection of human rights are invisible to everyone.

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