judicial precedent


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Related to judicial precedent: common law, Ratio decidendi, Statutory interpretation
See: authority, documentation

judicial precedent

see PRECEDENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Anglo-Saxon system of judicial precedent has been adopted by both the institutions of the European Economic Community (mainly the Court of Justice) and the European Court of Human Rights (Piperea, 2009).
The Constitution, in my view, thus leaves the question of judicial precedent to sub-constitutional law, which for state courts on this issue is state law.
often explain their departure from judicial precedent by employing a
KarakaE- said that eight of the 236 court cases that have been ruled on constitute a violation of judicial precedent.
Indiscriminate disposal is sure to alarm municipalities, but those seeking recourse through the courts will find that judicial precedent is not on their side, according to Raphael Sfeir, an environmental lawyer.
This is extremely serious since the court's decision can constitute a judicial precedent to further suppress media freedoms in occupied Palestine through occupation military courts.
Regardless of judicial precedent, there is a political call to action in many states to fix the widespread problem of defective construction, as shown by the various state legislatures.
This practice infuses judicial precedent with the prescriptive power of enacted constitutional and statutory text.
Legislation, judicial precedent, and regulatory changes alone are not going to eliminate that risk for companies large or small.
UK leadership in commercial affairs was built around the cornerstone of the philosophical principle and judicial precedent of negative liberty; ie citizens should not act in a way that is detrimental to the interests of other citizens, and underpinned by a monarchy and aristocracy which embraced a commitment to chivalry and honour.
The importance of establishing a judicial precedent through appeal becomes especially significant in cases involving property because the doctrine of stare decisis applies with peculiar force and strictness to those judicial decisions.