jump bail


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms.

jump bail

v. to fail to appear for a court appearance after depositing (posting) bail with the intention of avoiding prosecution, sentencing or going to jail. Posting bail guarantees that the accused person will give up the money if he/she does not show up in court. It allows the accused person to remain free pending the final decision on his/her criminal case. In some circumstances a criminal defendant can be declared to have jumped bail even before missing an appearance in court, if it is discovered he/she has left the state, the country, disappeared or made plans to flee. At that point the court can revoke the bail and issue a warrant for the defendant's arrest. It is also called "skipping" bail. (See: bail, bail bond, bail bondsman)

jump bail

to forfeit BAIL. To fail to appear in court to answer to a charge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Badeh on the other hand was granted bail with a bond of N2 billion, which his sureties equally risk losing if Mr Badeh attempts to jump bail.
Most Kenyans are conversant with my job and can easily spot me anywhere, making it impossible to jump bail," she said, adding that her child will suffer if she remains in custody until the conclusion of the trial.Ms Maribe, was arrested on September 29 over the murder of Ms Monica Kimani.
She said she is well known courtesy of her being on TV screens and that makes it difficult for her to jump bail if freed.
When the charges were read to the accused he pleaded not guilty, and the Defense Counsel representing the accused M.S Bangura applied for bail for his client that he would not jump bail neither interfere with the prosecution witness(s), and he is not also not a flight risk.
The officer said he feared McGuigan would use his continental contacts to jump bail if he was freed.
The Defence Counsel, Mr Philip Fasanmoye, applied for the bail of the defendant in the most liberal term and pledged that his client would not jump bail but would provide responsible sureties.
Defence Counsel, Mr Peter Oluwanisola, prayed the court to grant bail to his client on liberal terms, adding that he would not jump bail and always make himself available in court.
The EFCC vehemently objected to the bail application on the grounds that the defendant may likely jump bail if granted because her husband and all her children are based in the United States of America.
Unah promised that his client would not jump bail, but would produce substantial sureties.
Their counsel, Mr Sunday Ochai prayed the court to grant his clients bail, in the most liberal terms, promising that they would not jump bail and would always make themselves available in court.