juridical

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Juridical

Pertaining to the administration of justice or to the office of a judge.A juridical act is one that conforms to the laws and the rules of court. A juridical day is one on which the courts are in session.

juridical

of or relating to law, to the administration of justice, or to the office or function of a judge.

JURIDICAL. Signifies used in courts of law; done in conformity to the laws of the country, and the practice which is there observed.

References in periodicals archive ?
What is juridically pertinent about such a condition, on the reading I am urging, is not the immediate threat to life as such, the right to which, as some have claimed, cannot be given up on entering civil society; nor is it the inaccessibility of external means that would have been available in a state of nature in which all acquired property is merely provisional.
While the Babic Chamber applied JCE relentlessly, it supported this application of the legal standard with a (juridically unnecessary) discussion of Babic's intent, which reads like an insistence on his bad character.
(27) Accordingly, some German-speaking theologians prefer to interpret "irreformable" as letzverbindlich (juridically final).
By virtue of this free governance, the self and its free acts are juridically its own in an "ownership" that is essentially different from the ontological ownership "by" a non-personal being of what is a part of it because it is causally determined by its nature--not by a free personal center.
We cannot support an Israeli blockade which is morally and juridically unsupportable.
This volume presents a theoretical exploration of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) and associated multilateral initiatives (the Northern Dimension, the Union for the Mediterranean, Black Sea Synergy, and the Eastern Partnership) that are juridically more or less linked to the ENP.
The blacks and slaves in French America are introduced not as persons but as a special kind of property: a "thing;' according to Roman law, juridically deprived of all rights.
citizens and other[s] into slaves, juridically nonexistent" (9).
The political elite in neighboring Poland-Lithuania was protected against the negative effects of limitations on luxury by its membership in a juridically defined noble estate; instead, the leges sumptuariae particularly affected commoners who sought to compete with the nobility in the display of wealth.
If there was an agreement, did it constitute a juridically binding bargain, as the strong term "perfidy" suggests?
Doe, I claim that the "sex offender" has been juridically codified as the exhaustive figure of sexual amorality and dangerousness, a position vacated by the once homophobic but now more dignified juridical construction of the homosexual.
The military order instated then--which, juridically, resonates (not at all fortuitously) with the state of ...