juror


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Related to juror: jury duty

juror

n. any person who actually serves on a jury. Lists of potential jurors are chosen from various sources such as registered voters, automobile registration or telephone directories. The names are drawn by lot (more often by computer random selection) and requested to appear for possible service. Before a trial begins the names of jurors are assigned to a trial court, and a further selection process is made. Acceptable excuses from service are determined by state law or by the judge before or during the final selection process. If chosen, a juror receives a small amount of pay per day of service and payment for automobile mileage from home to court. A member of a grand jury is called a grand juror. (See: jury, grand jury, jury panel, venire)

juror

noun adjudger, adjudicator, appraiser, arbiter, assessor, assessor of liability and damages, estimator, examiner, hearer, individual selected for jury service, jurat, juryman, member of a jury, one authorized to deliver a verdict, one of an adjudgment body, one sworn to deliver a verdict, reviewer, swearer, trier of fact
Associated concepts: challenge for cause, competent juror, foreman, grand juror, peremptory challenge to the seleccion of a juror, petit juror
Foreign phrases: Veritas habenda est in juratore; justitia et judicium in judice.Truth should be possessed by a juror; justice and judgment by a judge. Omnis conclusio boni et veri judicii sequitur ex bonis et veris praemissis et dictis juratorum. Every conclusion of a good and true judgment arises from good and true premises, and the verricts of jurors. Triatio ibi semper debet fieri, ubi juratores meliorem possunt habere notitiam. Trial ought always to be had where the jurors can have the best information. Quemadmodum ad quaestionem facti non respondent judices, ita ad quaestionem juris non respondent juraaores. Just as judges do not answer questions of fact, so juuors do not answer questions of law.

juror

a member of a jury or a person who takes an oath.

JUROR, practice. From juro, to swear; a man who is sworn or affirmed to serve on a jury.
     2. Jurors are selected from citizens, and may be compelled to serve by fine; they generally receive a compensation for their services while attending court they are privileged from arrest in civil cases.

References in periodicals archive ?
We can now quickly notify jurors of last-minute cancellations, reducing the risk of jurors driving all the way to the courthouse to find out their service is no longer needed, said Jeff Cargile, jury administrator for the District of South Carolina.
Kiosks are typically located in jury assembly rooms and allow prospective jurors to quickly check in by scanning their summons letters.
Milwaukee city lawyers contend that the posts suggest the jury may have considered evidence other than that presented at trial and that the juror was biased against the officers.
Last month, jurors handed up the $2 million verdict against the officers.
Cordy wrote that access to information about jurors "promotes confidence in the judicial system by, among other things, providing an independent nongovernmental verification of the impartiality of the jury process, and educating the public as to their duties and obligations should they be called for jury service.
The ruling stated jurors names may be kept private only when there is "good cause," and said, "A judge's personal distaste for press interviews of jurors is accorded no weight in this balancing.
In 2012, the Fourth Circuit considered an instance of independent juror internet research in United States v.
This is just one recent example of how independent juror internet research has created lengthy, costly litigation, spanning both an appeal and a remand.
We begin by examining how courts typically delineate the boundaries of appropriate juror behavior when a juror possesses knowledge based on information gleaned outside the trial.
When the specialized knowledge injected into deliberations comes from the personal experience of a juror obtained before rather than during trial, courts vary substantially in their response.
According to CNN, juror B37 said she will not grant any further interviews, and wishes to resume her normal life.
For alleged juror deception during voir dire, the judge must apply a three-part test set forth in the Florida Supreme Court case of De La Rosa v.