jurors


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See: array, jury
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Bredar should have called a mistrial, saying his questioning of jurors was too general to accurately elicit their bias after he discovered during trial that they had either expressed or heard another juror express fear of possible gang reprisal for their jury service.
This scrutiny may take two forms: Just as jurors who hold strong opinions should not be dismissed out of hand unless the opinions are likely to affect the decision-making process, so, too, jurors who profess impartiality should not be blindly accepted without assurance that their strong opinions will not influence their application of the law.
An effective voir dire will inquire into potential jurors' views about sexual harassment claims and litigation.
After jurors convicted Dan Mylett of assaulting a police officer in 2016, Dan's twin brother, Patrick Mylett, and Dan's girlfriend "loudly confronted" jurors as they were leaving the courtroom in 2016.
Oftentimes these types of cases are discussed in the context of jurors using social media platforms to discuss trial proceedings despite being instructed not to do so, but the two cases that caught my eye while researching cases this summer involved jurors improperly using other types of technology in ways that were alleged to have had an impact on criminal trials.
Jurors are sometimes required to hear evidence and testimony about violent and traumatic crimes, including crimes against children and other vulnerable people.
Jurors must not discuss the trial with anyone during the trial except when they are in the jury deliberation room and all jurors are present.
Smotherman's attorneys contacted several jurors after trial, and one of the jurors said that he researched the weather on the day of the accident.
SunWolf is extremely credible in writing about the misconceptions of attorneys in what they think jurors base their decisions on in court, and how jurors act.
A juror in the Bill Cosby sexual assault case which ended in mistrial, said under the condition of anonymity that hours of deliberations led to 10 of the 12 jurors (seven men and five women) agreeing the 79-year-old comedian was guilty on two of the three charges of felony aggravated indecent assault.
The juror, who spoke to ABC News on condition of anonymity, said that 10 of the 12 jurors thought he was guilty on the first and third felony count; one juror thought he was guilty on the second count.
Expert jurors--that is, jurors with relevant personal expertise--pose a