track

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track

the type of procedures which will apply to a case under the Civil Procedure Rules.
References in periodicals archive ?
With a $34,000 federal Education Enhancement Through Technology grant, Gray started small, buying Palms m30s, software and keyboards so students could keep track of their assignments and type.
The DRM for mobile services will enable operators to keep track of ring tones and other digital content - such as news, music and comedy clips - even when they are sent from one mobile phone to another.
The best way to keep track of washings is to use a laundry marker or indelible pen to mark on the JSLIST care label each time you wash it.
Since IP is a "stateless" protocol, additional protocols like RSVP and RTP must be used to keep track of call states for services, and especially QoS-based applications that demand specific bandwidth.
Consider the inertial measurement units developed to keep track of a missile's movement.
The scanners may also be used in the future to keep track of where students get off the bus each day.
Web-based PIMs, like their PC captive counterparts, can keep track of your appointments, contacts and meetings.
Furthermore, storage resources, backup devices, and applications are so numerous and diverse that it is difficult to physically keep track of them all.
The whales clearly chatter to communicate and to keep track of each other, but researchers can only guess at the meaning of many of those sounds.
Users can keep track of room appointments scheduled through Outlook/Exchange or GroupWise.
The Liquid Player also makes it easy to keep track of your digital music files, view liner notes and cover artwork and make your own CDs if you have a CD-R drive that lets you create your own CDs.
The key to subitizing may lie in several networks of brain cells that work simultaneously to isolate and keep track of objects in a visual scene, argue Stanislas Dehaene of the National Center for Scientific Research and Laurent Cohen of Salpetriere Hospital, both in Paris.