post

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post

v. 1) to place a notice on the entrance or a prominent place on real property, such as a notice to quit (leave), pay rent, or a notice of intent to conduct a sheriff's sale, which requires mailing of a copy to the occupant to complete service of the notice. 2) to place a legal notice on a designated public place at the courthouse. 3) a commercial term for recording a payment. 4) to mail.

post

noun appointment, berth, billet, business, career, charge, commission, department, field, function, incumbency, job, line, locus, means of livelihood, munus, occupation, office, place, position, pursuit, service, situation, station, task, vocation, work

post

verb advertise, announce publicly, bestow, call public attention to, circulate, communicate, convey, deliver, dispose of, distribute, give away, give forth, give out, give public notice of, impart, issue, issue a statement, make known, make public, offer to the public, pay, present, print, proclaim, publish, put up a sign, report, spread, spread abroad
Associated concepts: post a notice, post bail
See also: annunciate, appointment, bond, book, calling, career, communicate, convey, deposit, dispatch, employment, enter, induct, inform, inscribe, issue, itemize, location, notify, occupation, office, organ, pawn, pledge, position, publish, pursuit, record, register, role, seat, send, set down, situation, stand, standpoint, title, trade, work

POST. After. When two or more alienations or descents have taken place between an original intruder ant or defendant in a writ of entry, the writ is said to be in the post, because it states that the tenant had not entry unless after the ouster of the original intruder. 3 Bl. Com. 182. See Entry, limit of.

References in periodicals archive ?
Even as Keeping Posted conveyed Israel's importance as a focus of Jewish life, however, the magazine also communicated unease about the place of religion in contemporary Israeli life, echoing the concerns of the young Reform visitors to Israel quoted above.
Though leadership institutes and summer camps were not systematically Zionist in theory or practice, they, along with the popular Keeping Posted magazine, served Zionist educators as prime channels for bringing Israel into the lives of Reform youth in a meaningful, memorable way.
At NFTY conclaves, at summer camps, and in the pages of Keeping Posted, postwar Reform youth learned that to be a good Jew and a good American meant engaging with Israel.