track

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track

the type of procedures which will apply to a case under the Civil Procedure Rules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Continue reading "Keeping Track of the Holidays" at...
Keeping track of all documents relating to a matter is often best handled with a centralized platform.
Commenting on the potential contributions of keeping track of economy and employment, Zachau said both employers and employees would gain a lot, productivity would increase and fragile segments of the society would be protected if such a stance was adopted.
Rheaume said he's not liable for keeping track of everyone's hours because the people he hires are subcontractors, not employees.
Keeping track of former Architectural Association computery stuff genius, John Fraser, has always been interesting and the latest clue to what he is doing (research co-ordinator for Gehry Technologies) is in a footnote to an interview with him in Architecture Australia whose website is at www.architectureaustralia.com/aa/.
"I used to spend more time than I like to remember keeping track of calendar issues," he recalls.
Even when keeping track of eight fake flowers, hummingbirds tended to visit the refilled flowers at appropriate intervals--about lO minutes for quickly refilled flowers and 20 minutes for the slower refills.--S.M.
He finds most companies and organizations have great difficulty keeping track of employee health and safety training records, which he calls a "critical loophole," should they be challenged in court.
Studley also had a group of 15 volunteers sort coats on January 10th, but because the group was a bit smaller, they selected not to compromise its coat-sorting pace by keeping track of the quantity sorted.
"The students are not reading the fine print." Howard Waterman, a spokesman for Verizon Wireless, suggests finding a cost-effective package and keeping track of text-messaging activity by reviewing your account online.
Just keeping track of who knows what, from which time period, is a monumental task.