King

(redirected from kingliness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

KING. The chief magistrate of a kingdom, vested usually with the executive power.
     2. The following table of the reigns of English and British kings and queens, commencing with the Reports, is added, to assist the student in many points of chronology.


     Accession. Henry III................ 1216 Edward I................. 1272 Edward II................ 1307 Edward III............... 1307 Richard II............... 1377 Henry IV................. 1399 Henry V.................. 1413 Henry VI................. 1422 Edward IV................ 1461 Edward V................. 1483 Richard III.............. 1483 Henry VII................ 1485 Henry VIII............... 1509 Edward VI................ 1547 Mary..................... 1553 Elizabeth................ 1558 James I.................. 1603 Charles I................ 1625 Charles II............... 1660 James II................. 1685 William III.............. 1689 Anne..................... 1702 George I................. 1714 George II................ 1727 George III............... 1760 George IV................ 1820 William IV............... 1830 Victoria................. 1837

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
They took weakness and submissiveness as its external manifestation, and emptiness and non-destructiveness to all things as its inner reality." (13) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "'How is it that the daimonic descends and clear-seeing emerges?' There is that from which sageliness springs and of which kingliness is constituted: both have their source in the One." (14) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] Zhaungzi, "Lie Yukou": "The form of the Supreme One is emptiness." (15)
This two-part study begins with "The Sovereign Subject," three chapters that examine works from Cicero through Bacon on the "kingliness" of the subject in private friendship.
However, there is no gap between what is inward and outward, as all Confucian philosophers subscribe to the ideal of nei-sheng wai-wang (inward sageliness and outward kingliness), nor is there a gap between theory and practice.
Some listeners may have a few quibbles with Aragorn's lisp, which can detract from his "kingliness," and Frodo's tendency to snarl rather than to be nobly long-suffering, but overall this is a splendid production and, like NPR's enjoyable version, also an excellent alternative for the aural learner.