King

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KING. The chief magistrate of a kingdom, vested usually with the executive power.
     2. The following table of the reigns of English and British kings and queens, commencing with the Reports, is added, to assist the student in many points of chronology.


     Accession. Henry III................ 1216 Edward I................. 1272 Edward II................ 1307 Edward III............... 1307 Richard II............... 1377 Henry IV................. 1399 Henry V.................. 1413 Henry VI................. 1422 Edward IV................ 1461 Edward V................. 1483 Richard III.............. 1483 Henry VII................ 1485 Henry VIII............... 1509 Edward VI................ 1547 Mary..................... 1553 Elizabeth................ 1558 James I.................. 1603 Charles I................ 1625 Charles II............... 1660 James II................. 1685 William III.............. 1689 Anne..................... 1702 George I................. 1714 George II................ 1727 George III............... 1760 George IV................ 1820 William IV............... 1830 Victoria................. 1837

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is his Kingship: He casts light on our own pilgrimage in life, and guides (not simply shows) the way of peace, joy and love.
Christ's kingship is indeed a powerful message we can rally behind today, but it is also just one facet of the Good News.
The keynote address was entitled 'Alaafinology: The Ideology and Epistemology of Kingship'.
This important book is recommended for anyone interested in the complex and highly contested representations of kingship in ancient India and the violence it entails by necessity.
Julien Thery-Astruc's analysis of William de Nogaret's key role in the recasting of French kingship in religious terms forms a magisterial centrepiece to the book's third section.
Citing Justin McDaniel and Christine Gray, he argues that old ideas of kingship have been reintroduced from Thailand's rural provinces, where they were never fully eclipsed, and that the military, monarchy, bureaucracy and commercial banks have mounted sophisticated propaganda campaigns to represent the economic development of the country in the guise of the ascetic practice of an ostensible bodhisatta king.
Issues pertaining to royal rise and succession are discussed in chapter six; chapter seven explores the problem of legitimation of kingship. Chapter eight offers a synthesis of the topics discussed throughout the book, and the final chapter situates the results in the context of broader research questions.
The aim of the project has been to elucidate the relationship between Norwegian kingship and the Crown's 'tributary lands' in the west and the ways in which kingship influenced socio-political developments at the margins of the realm.
The interpretive effect of this bracketing is to link the source of Israel's blessing, both to instruction in and meditation upon the Torah (Psalm 1), as well as to the LORD's gift of kingship to Israel (Psalm 2).
He reviews the accepted accounts of late Roman and fifth-century Britain before the 1970s, all the period sources through the methodology, and what they say about the nature of the British and Germanic peoples in the fifth century in terms of chronology, continuation of British romanitas, local government, and factors in the rise of kingship, as well as how Hengest, Horsa, and Gwrtheyrn interacted.