family

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Related to kinship group: nuclear family, Status group

family

n. 1) husband, wife and children. 2) all blood relations. 3) all who live in the same household including servants and relatives, with some person or persons directing this economic and social unit.

family

(Common ancestry), noun ancestry, birth, blood connection, clan, common extraction, common forebears, common lineage, common parentage, consanguinity, descent, dynasty, ethnic group, ethnicity, filiation, folk, genealogy, house, kin, kindred, kinsmen, line, line of ancestors, line of descent, lineage, origin, parentage, people, same line of descent, same strain, sept, stirps, stock, strain, tribe

family

(Household), noun brood, domestic circle, dooestic establishment, familia, family unit, home circle, issue, offspring, progeny
Associated concepts: adoption, curtesy, dependent, domestic relation, dower, Family Court, family law, family purpose doccrine, head of household, heirs, next of kin, surviving spouse
See also: ancestry, bloodline, derivation, descendant, domestic, house, household, issue, kindred, kinship, lineage, next of kin, origin, parentage, paternal, posterity, progeny, race, relative, succession
References in periodicals archive ?
Kinship is an important element in people's daily lives, society, and politics in rural China, Previous studies have found that kinship groups in a village are often in conflict with each other and hence villages with multiple kinship groups tend to have worse village governance performance.
Although as larger kinship groups the Balochis and Farzana's clan were not in any hierarchical relationship, within the immediate context of the village, the Balochis were not as powerful, in terms of political connections and land holdings, as the Channa landlords addressed honorifically as Jams.
Prior to contact and to some extent today, the Woodland Cree have applied traditional ways of teaching to recognize relationships between members of kinship groups. Since the Cree language was used in everyday life, the people did not encounter difficulties with the terminology and the application on the ways of belonging and relating to their members.
Here are just a few ways to create these common kinship groups:
One is that there is virtually no middle ground between a democracy-destroying "Presidential Government" (as he characterizes the current system in the United States) and democracy-enhancing informal, cooperative arrangements centered in families, kinship groups, and local associations.
The village worship association and popular cult, though different in size and membership, were organized to worship a tutelary deity, which was often regarded as the founding ancestor of a kinship group. Meanwhile, cloisters or chapels were constructed principally to take care of one family's ancestors.
But in addition to suggesting that the individual realizes her full potential only within the supporting bonds of a strong kinship group (no matter how unconventionally that group might be defined), the conclusion to The Color Purple also addresses the vexing question posed by the Olinka Adam narrative: Is progress in race relations possible?
1989 Kinship Group and Patrilineal Executives in a Developing Nation.
What made a powerful man (jumbe) was in part membership in a recognized (but rather loosely defined) kinship group, part religious prestige, part having a large array of clients, slaves, and other followers.
13), and prefers for it "residential kinship group." Blenkinsopp (p.
In section one, Tapper stated that he was going to use the term tribe as a synonym of taifeh, a kinship group of some four hundred people in a distinct territory, who form the basic building block of the Shahsevan confederacy.
Kinship groups have an interestingly sophisticated system of group insurance, essentially committing to pitching in to help make good on costly misbehavior by their relatives.