lapis

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The jewellery range includes necklaces, bangles, rings and earrings featuring semiprecious stones such as agate, yellow tiger's eye and lapis lazuli.
The amazing quality of lapis lazuli, the purity of its colour and the mystery of its origins have meant it has been pursued through the ages as a rare and precious gemstone.
The artifacts include a bronze figurine of a dog with a golden collar and a sphinx, part of a bracelet made of semi-precious lapis lazuli.
The best lapis lazuli, for example, comes from Afghanistan, we source materials from Hong Kong, New Zealand and Dubai.
Available in White Pearl, Lapis Lazuli and Starlight Black, the IS250C Limited Edition will attract discerning customer's intent on getting the very best specification level available in the convertible market.
The exhibits also include, a rare Maiolica Albarello dating back to 16th century Italy with the portrait of Ibn Sina (Avicenna), a magnificent royal casket mounted with Lapis Lazuli and set with gold and diamonds from England dating back to the 19th century, a fine gem set jade box from India and a fine intact Kashan lustre star tile with Mangol figures suggesting impact of the Mangol invasion on Iran.
The finds included a gold bracelet encrusted with a lapis lazuli stone in the shape of a circular seal, two gold clasps, bronze clasps, a sheet of gold with a depiction of a palm tree, a small crystal jar, and a stone statue of a hippopotamus of Egyptian origin, which is believed to have been sent as a present.
The economic problems of a market flooded by glass replicas of emeralds and lapis lazuli are reported, as well.
The colour scheme is based on Lapis Lazuli blues with warm, earthy brown tones.
2-pound) solid gold death mask encrusted with lapis lazuli and semi-precious stones.
Summary: A flattened human head draped with gold and lapis lazuli jewelry lies in a glass case at the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, its teeth the only recognizable feature.