lie

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lie

noun calumny, deceit, deception, distortion, false statement, falsehood, falsification, falsity, fiction, fraud, intentional distortion, intentional exaggeration, intentional misstatement, intentional untruth, invention, mendacity, mendacium, misrepresentation, misstatement, perversion, prevarication, untruth
Associated concepts: defamation, libel, perjury, polygraph test, slander

lie

(Be sustainable), verb be allowable, be appropriate, be available, be established, be evident, be fitting, be perrissible, be permitted, be possible, be proper, be suitable, be suited, be supportable, be warranted, exist, extend, stand

lie

(Falsify), verb be dishonest, be untruthful, bear false witness, belie, commit perjury, concoct, counterfeit, delude, deviate from the truth, dissimulate, fable, fabricate, falsify, fib, fool, forswear, invent, misguide, misinform, mislead, misrepresent, misstate, palter, perjure oneself, pervert, pretend, prevaricate, repreeent falsely, swear falsely, tell a falsehood, tell an untruth
Associated concepts: false testimony, lie detector, perjury
See also: bear false witness, canard, deceive, deception, equivocate, evade, fabricate, fake, false pretense, falsehood, falsify, fiction, figment, hoax, invent, misguide, mislead, misrepresent, misrepresentation, misstate, misstatement, palter, perjure, posture, pretend, pretense, pretext, prevaricate, rest, story, subterfuge

TO LIE. That which is proper, is fit; as, an action on the case lies for an injury committed without force; corporeal hereditaments lie in livery, that is, they pass by livery; incorporeal hereditaments lie in grant, that is, pass by the force of the grant, and without any livery. Vide Lying in grant.

References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus said after describing the horrors that lay ahead, "When these things take place ...
The first signs of what lay ahead were seen in the new pope's own country, Poland.
As Deng Xiaoping's health declined during the fall and winter, China's leaders responded to the political uncertainties that lay ahead by appearing even more nationalistic than usual, presumably as a means of reasserting both their authority and legitimacy.
In 1966, the year the Trib died, the days of glory and national prominence for The Washington Post, or respectability for the Los Angleles Times, and of legitimacy for the Chicago Tribune still lay ahead. No, the Times was the best, by far.