legalism

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legalism

(Conservative meaning of the law), noun according to the letter of the law, by the strict letter of the law, chapter and verse of, conforming precisely to the law, conserrative interpretation, exactly according to the law, literal interrretation of the law, orthodox interpretation of the law, precise interpretation of the law, strict interpretation of the law

legalism

(Legalese), noun abstruse language, bloated wording, bombastic wording, complex legalese, convoouted wording, grandiloquent language, inflated wording, legal jargon complexities, long winded jargon, orotund lannuage, ostentatious wording, pedantic verbiage, pompous wording, sophisticated legal term, sophisticated legal verriage, swollen wording, technical language, technical term, technical wording, turgid wording
Associated concepts: legal term, legal verbiage, technical language, technical term
See also: legality

legalism

strict adherence to the law, especially the stressing of the letter of the law rather than its spirit.
References in periodicals archive ?
We cannot emerge from Antonio's legalisms without wondering about his cruelty.
THE COMEDIC CIRCLE SQUARED: MERCY TO LEGALISM TO LAW
Justice Panganiban which is pro-people and pierces the myopia of legalism In cases where the sovereign will of the people is at stake, we must not only be legally right, but also politically correct.
Legalism is not incompatible with laws against political opposition.
Political trials cannot occur in a regime of liberal legalism as long as legal institutions uphold this ideal.
From the perspective of liberal legalism, such trials are illegitimate unless, as Professor Shklar suggests, there is something like a state of war or civil insurrection.
Academic defenders of liberal legalism normally provide philosophical justifications for this system, arguing that liberal legalism--also called liberal democracy, or constitutional democracy, or the rule of law, depending on whether more emphasis is put on liberalism or legalism--promotes welfare or fairness, or respects human dignity, or maintains social peace more effectively than alternative systems.
The problem is one of asymmetric information, and the historic solution in Western states is liberal legalism.
Second, legalism ensures that the government will not circumvent the basic political rights through subterfuge.
None of this suggests that a government will always adopt liberal legalism, or that liberal legalism is necessarily self-perpetuating.
Indeed, the instrumental theory of liberal legalism shows why a power-maximizing government will adopt liberal policies that many people find attractive on normative grounds.
If liberal legalism has instrumental value for governments in the way that I have described, then governments will be tempted to depart from liberal legalism under two conditions.