Practice

(redirected from legitimate medical practice)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Practice

Repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of similar kind; custom; usage. The exercise of any profession.

The form or mode or proceeding in courts of justice for the enforcement of rights or the redress of wrongs, as distinguished from the Substantive Law that gives the right or denounces the wrong. The form, manner, or order of instituting and conducting an action or other judicial proceeding, through its successive stages to its end, in accordance with the rules and principles laid down by law or by the regulations and precedents of the courts.

An attorney is actually engaged in the Practice of Law when she maintains an office, offers to perform legal services, describes herself as an attorney on letterheads or business cards, counsels clients, negotiates with other parties or opposing counsel, and fixes and collects fees for legal work. A doctor is practicing medicine when he discovers the cause and nature of diseases, treats illnesses and injuries, or prescribes and administers medical or surgical care. Lawyers and doctors must qualify for licenses before they may practice their professions.

practice

1) n. custom or habit as shown by repeated action, as in "it is the practice in the industry to confirm orders before shipping." 2) the legal business, as in "law practice," or "the practice of the law." 3) v. to repeat an activity in order to maintain or improve skills, as "he practices the violin every evening." 4) v. to conduct a law business, as "she practices law in St. Louis."

PRACTICE. The form, manner and order of conducting and carrying on suits or prosecutions in the courts through their various stages, according, to the principles of law, and the rules laid down by the respective courts.
     2. By practice is also meant the business which an attorney or counsellor does; as, A B has a good practice.
     3. The books on practice are very numerous; among the most popular are those Of Tidd, Chitty, Archbold, Sellon, Graham, Dunlap, Caines, Troubat and Haly, Blake, Impey.
     4. A settled, uniform, and loll, continued practice, without objection is evidence of what the law is, and such practice is based on principles which are founded in justice and convenience. Buck, 279; 2 Russ. R. 19, 570; 2 Jac. It. 232; 5 T. R. 380; 1 Y. & J. 167, 168; 2 Crompt. & M. 55; Ram on Judgm. ch. 7.

References in periodicals archive ?
The defeated resolution took aim at Attorney General John Ashcroft's 2001 ruling that assisting suicide is not a "legitimate medical practice," with the consequence that under federal law federally controlled narcotics and other dangerous drugs may not be used to assist suicide.
Kenneth Stevens, spokesman for Physicians for Compassionate Care, which opposes Oregon's law, said he hopes the high court will toss out the law on the grounds that giving lethal prescriptions is not a legitimate medical practice.
Trial and appellate courts affirmed that the Controlled Substances Act does not give the federal government the power to say what is a legitimate medical practice.
Gregory Hamilton, spokesman for Physicians for Compassionate Care, which opposes the Oregon law, said no matter what Jones ruled, doctor-assisted suicide is not a legitimate medical practice.
In a striking example of this, a shock discovery was made in early 2012 that legitimate medical practices in the US were unwittingly buying a counterfeit version of the cancer drug Avastin, which contained no active ingredients.