legitimate

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Legitimate

To make lawful, such as when a child is born prior to the parents' marriage and they subsequently wed and thereby confer upon the child the same legal status as those born in lawful wedlock.

That which is lawful, legal, recognized by law, or in accordance with law, such as legitimate children or legitimate authority; real, valid, or genuine.

Cross-references

Illegitimacy.

legitimate

adj., adv.: 1) legal, proper, real. 2) referring to a child born to parents who are married. A baby born to parents who are not married is illegitimate, but can be made legitimate (legitimatized) by the subsequent marriage of the parents. 3) v. to make proper and/or legal.

legitimate

(Lawfully conceived), adjective born in wedlock, born of parents legally married, conceived of parrnts legally married, natural, of lawful parentage, sired in wedlock
Associated concepts: legitimate issue

legitimate

(Rightful), adjective according to law, allowed, authorized, constitutional, enacted, genuine, in accordance with law, in accordance with legal provisions, juristic, law-abiding, lawful, legal, legalized, legislated, licit, mandated, official, real, recognized by law, rightful, sanctioned, sanctioned by custom, sanctioned by law, sanctioned by legal authority, sound, statutable, valid, well-founded, well-grounded, within the law
Associated concepts: legitimate business, legitimate heirs, legitimate purpose, legitimate title

legitimate

verb approve, authorize, certify, declare lawful, legalize, legitimatize, make lawful, make legal, make legitimate, sanction, validate
See also: admissible, allowable, allowed, authentic, authorize, bona fide, choate lien, constitute, correct, de jure, due, establish, ethical, fit, formalize, genuine, honest, justifiable, justify, lawful, legal, legalize, licit, official, permissible, plausible, proper, rational, real, regular, reliable, right, rightful, sanction, sane, scrupulous, sound, straightforward, tenable, true, upright, valid, veridical, viable, well-grounded

legitimate

authorized, sanctioned by, or in accordance with law.

LEGITIMATE. That which is according to law; as, legitimate children, are lawful children, born in wedlock, in contradistinction to bastards; legitimate authority, or lawful power, in opposition to usurpation.

References in periodicals archive ?
23) Beck argues that the "institutions of industrial society become the producers and legitimators of threats which they cannot control.
They include: ritual legitimators, ritual entrepreneurs, ritual sponsors, and ritual enforcers (for a discussion of these concepts see Knottnerus, Van Delinder, and Edwards 2011).
Including these views could provide additional evidence of uptake of one discourse over the other; however, the sectors chosen play key roles in the social construction and maintenance of environmental issues - either as representatives of environmental-ism, legitimators of claims (science) or gatekeepers of policy - and are thus likely to provide a reasonable assessment of environmental justice language in the wider debate.
corporatist system entails a change in the role of political parties from representative and interest aggregating bodies to legitimators of policy generated in the corporate sector of interest representation.
Solar deities, above all Amun-Re, are shown to be the most important of the king's legitimators, though any such conclusions may be insecure due to the possibly unrepresentative contexts and findspots of the monuments.
Some such discourse is indicated in the work of people like Giroux and Britzman through the suggestion that the learning goals of institutions can be legitimators and/or facilitators of social belonging and identity discourse.
Key ACM legitimators from mental health and the legal profession helped develop ideas about "brainwashing" and "mind control" in a more acceptable manner.
Frameworks such as the above simply offer some language in which to conduct meta-dialogue, and a basis for considering the variety of legitimators and guarantors available to dialogue.
Quite appropriately, Daly calls such religiosity "sadospirituality," and its male and female proponents "sadospiritual legitimators.