lessor


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Lessor

One who rents real property or Personal Property to another.

A lessor of land is a landlord.

Cross-references

Landlord and Tenant.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lessor

n. the owner of real property who rents it to a lessee pursuant to a written lease. Thus, he/she/it is the landlord and the lessee is the tenant. (See: lease, lessee, landlord, tenant, landlord and tenant)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

lessor

a person who grants a LEASE of property.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

LESSOR. contr. He who grants a lease. Civ. Code of L. art. 2647.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
(22) Lease payments cover the value of the car over a set period of time, after which possession of the car reverts to the lessor, while a consumer under a credit purchase eventually has unencumbered ownership of the car.
Finally, CA 20 01 notes that the lessor is not liable for the payment of the policy premium; the named insured is the responsible party.
* Open-end lease--one in which the difference between the value stated in the contract and the lessor's appraised value at the end of the lease must be paid by the consumer.
As illustrated, today's best lessors are much more than financing institutions.
Since in this case major risk is borne by the lessor, so the equipment that the lessor chooses is of that kind that in case if the lessee terminates the lease, the lessor will be in a position to lease that equipment to another party easily.
The benefit from leasing in this model is realized even if the marginal tax rate is the same for the lessee and lessor.
particulars of the supplier (i.e the person or entity supplying the leased asset to the lessor) ('Supplier'); and
Under the Civil Code, a lessor may judicially eject the lessee for any of the following causes:
A lessee files for bankruptcy protection, does not make any payments to the lessor, but is not using the subject equipment, What can the lessor do?
Lessors say liquidity is abundant and that financial strains in one part of the globe can be offset by demand elsewhere.
The customer just needs to activate his account in the system; which saves time and effort on the lessor and the tenant by using this developed online system.
This article will provide a brief overview of lessor and lessee accounting, followed by a more detailed discussion and analysis of the sale and leaseback provisions in ASC Topic 842.