licence


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licence

1 a permission given by one person to another to do some act that, without such permission, it would be unlawful for him to do. In relation to land, a licence may arise gratuitously, or by contract, or by estoppel. Licences arising from a gratuitous act may generally be revoked at the will of the grantor unless some question of estoppel arises; licences arising from a contract are capable of specific enforcement. Licensing is at the heart of the exploitation of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. A software developer will normally grant a licence of copyright to the end user which will permit copying (often necessary to use software) and impose restrictions on use.
2 an official document authorizing a specified activity that would be unlawful for the licensee to engage in without such document (e.g. a liquor licence authorizing the manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquor; a driving licence authorizing the holder to drive a motor vehicle on the public highway).
References in classic literature ?
The husband, whose name was Thomas Benjamin, had taken out his marriage licence as Thomas only; suppressing the Benjamin, in case he should not find himself as comfortable as he expected.
It is your own fault for being a terrier; I do not require a licence, and neither does Kep, the Collie dog.
On these occasions, he would redouble in energy, and declare that black was white, and blue yellow, with much conviction and heat of manner; but in the morning such a licence of debate weighed upon him like a crime, and he would seek out his father, where he walked before breakfast on a terrace overlooking all the vale of Thyme.
In general the continental, or at least the Belgian old women permit themselves a licence of manners, speech, and aspect, such as our venerable granddames would recoil from as absolutely disreputable, and Madame Reuter's jolly face bore evidence that she was no exception to the rule of her country; there was a twinkle and leer in her left eye; her right she kept habitually half shut, which I thought very odd indeed.
Upon my word, it is really a pity that it should not take place directly, if we had but a proper licence, for here we are altogether, and nothing in the world could be more snug and pleasant.
He had given them more than thirty years - thirty-three, to be exact; and they now seemed to him to have organised their performance quite on the scale of that licence.
In truth the masquerade licence of the night was nearly unlimited; but the figure in question had out-Heroded Herod, and gone beyond the bounds of even the prince's indefinite decorum.
From the problem of the licence in cross-examination, their talk strayed to Roman and mediaeval torture, to the examining magistrate in France and the Third Degree in America.
Gania having once descended to abuse, and receiving no check, very soon knew no bounds or limit to his licence, as is often the way in such cases.