licence

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licence

1 a permission given by one person to another to do some act that, without such permission, it would be unlawful for him to do. In relation to land, a licence may arise gratuitously, or by contract, or by estoppel. Licences arising from a gratuitous act may generally be revoked at the will of the grantor unless some question of estoppel arises; licences arising from a contract are capable of specific enforcement. Licensing is at the heart of the exploitation of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. A software developer will normally grant a licence of copyright to the end user which will permit copying (often necessary to use software) and impose restrictions on use.
2 an official document authorizing a specified activity that would be unlawful for the licensee to engage in without such document (e.g. a liquor licence authorizing the manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquor; a driving licence authorizing the holder to drive a motor vehicle on the public highway).
References in periodicals archive ?
This, of course, will give the operating companies a monopoly of a compulsory system, thus guaranteeing them a license to print money.
Using such machines when demand is high simply means that the unit is a cash cow and a license to print money. But personally, I don't see how anyone seriously interested in driving either productivity or long-term profitability can take such an argument seriously.
The problems bedeviling the marque date back to the end of Sir William Lyons' reign, and were exacerbated by overzealous business school grads-cum-marketing majors at Ford who saw the British car maker as a license to print money. How else to explain the near-continuous missteps in both styling and positioning, or the three plants--three!--that were dedicated to Jaguar production?