cycle

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Related to life cycle: Product life cycle, Life cycle assessment, Project life cycle

cycle

noun age, alternation, circle, circuit, consecution, course, eon, epoch, era, flow, period, recurrence, recurring period, regular return, regglarity of recurrence, repetitiveness, revolution, rotation, round, sequence, succession
See also: annum, frequency, life, sequence, succession
References in periodicals archive ?
BPIC CEO, Mr Ian Frame, said that the Green Building Council of Australia has expressed interest in life cycle based credits from the BPIC and AusLCI projects and may incorporate these into future Green Star ratings.
DoD assigns life cycle management responsibility to the program manager:
This puts the burden on the designers, product developers and R&D managers to drive the life cycle improvement.
Records management programs are not designed to produce archives, but to manage records efficiently and systematically through their life cycle.
The back end of the data life cycle is swelling, not shrinking as was the case previously, and retention policies are now being based on data value and legal issues, not just reference activity.
The guide presents a framework for incorporating security into the information system development life cycle (SDLC) process.
The team looked at 61 long-term analyses that collectively focused on life cycle changes among almost 700 species or groups of related species during the past 50 years.
The life cycle planning approach estimates both current and future renewal requirements for each campus facility, by individual system (electrical, HVAC, plumbing, roofing, etc.
The LPIT took responsibility for developing the FMS reserve for Naval Aviation FMS customers with the goal of enhancing life cycle logistics support for FMS customer weapon systems.
However, end-of-life is only one of several stages in the life cycle of a product where costs are incurred; indirect costs can also be incurred during the manufacture and use of a product.
It introduces the historiography and the relevant theoretical perspectives ('Durkheim and beyond'); discusses the working of the law on suicide; develops the key organizing context of the life cycle in Victorian towns, which is the overarching theme around which most of Bailey's questions are pivoted; sets the local context for the study by presenting the urban ecology of Hull; charts the changing incidence of suicide statistically, with appropriate caveats; and moves on to the main body of the evidence, discussing the incidence and context of suicide at four life-cycle stages (and thereby breathing new life into discussions of living standards from a completely novel angle).