Lift

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Lift

To raise; to take up.

To lift a promissory note (a written commitment to pay a sum of money on a certain date) is to terminate the obligation by paying its amount.

To lift the bar of the Statute of Limitations is to remove, by some sufficient act or Acknowledgment, the obstruction that it interposes. For example, some states will not permit an action to be instituted on a debt owed after ten years from the date of the debt. This is a ten-year statute of limitations. If the debtor acknowledges in writing that he or she owes the debt and will pay it on a certain date, this conduct lifts the bar of the statute of limitations so that the debtor can be sued on the debt for another ten years.

References in classic literature ?
We are to secure all "loose objects"; hood up our Fleury Rays; and "on no account to attempt to clear snow from our conning-towers till the weather abates." Under-powered craft, we are told, can ascend to the limit of their lift, mail-packets to look out for them accordingly; the lower lanes westward are pitting very badly, "with frequent blow-outs, vortices, laterals, etc."
Father Brown found Flambeau and some six other people standing round the enclosed space into which the lift commonly descended.
Monsieur Surville lifted his hands in polite remonstrance.
"For a moment I stood thinking, then I lifted up my voice and howled like a wolf, and lo!
Sir Henry, Good, and Umbopa ranged themselves alongside of me, and lifted their rifles.
Then she lifted both hands, with all the fingers and thumbs spread out, and cried:
His hands were concealed in the cloud of the horse's lifted mane.
Anne gently unwound the arms that clung round her--gently lifted the head that lay helpless on her bosom.
I caught sight of him toiling at the main-sheet, heaving it in and flat with his tremendous muscles, the stern of the schooner lifted high in the air and his body outlined against a white surge of sea sweeping past.
The Fairy, who was waiting at the door of the house, lifted the poor little Marionette in her arms, took him to a dainty room with mother-of-pearl walls, put him to bed, and sent immediately for the most famous doctors of the neighborhood to come to her.
And Lizaveta Petrovna, with one hand supporting the wobbling head, lifted up on the other arm the strange, limp, red creature, whose head was lost in its swaddling clothes.
A few minutes before the end he asked me to lift him on his pillow, to see the sun rise through the window.