References in classic literature ?
There was no want of likeness, she had been fortunate in the attitude, and as she meant to throw in a little improvement to the figure, to give a little more height, and considerably more elegance, she had great confidence of its being in every way a pretty drawing at last, and of its filling its destined place with credit to them botha standing memorial of the beauty of one, the skill of the other, and the friendship of both; with as many other agreeable associations as Mr.
Yes, good man!thought Emmabut what has all that to do with taking likenesses? You know nothing of drawing.
He reached out his hand for the locket and took it away from her, examining the likenesses within with unmistakable signs of surprise and new interest.
The girl pointed to the photograph and then to the miniature and then to him, as though to indicate that she thought the likenesses were of him, but he only shook his head, and then shrugging his great shoulders, he took the photograph from her and having carefully rewrapped it, placed it again in the bottom of his quiver.
The locket had belonged to Lord Greystoke, and the likenesses were of himself and Lady Alice.
The inhabitants, his old neighbors and their grown-up children, were resolved to welcome the renowned warrior with a salute of cannon and a public dinner; and all the more enthusiastically, it being affirmed that now, at last, the likeness of the Great Stone Face had actually appeared.
But now, again, there were reports and many paragraphs in the newspapers, affirming that the likeness of the Great Stone Face had appeared upon the broad shoulders of a certain eminent statesman.
So now again, as buoyantly as ever, he went forth to behold the likeness of the Great Stone Face.
'No!' said Ernest, bluntly, 'I see little or no likeness.'
Pensive with the fulness of such discourse, his guests took leave and went their way; and passing up the valley, paused to look at the Great Stone Face, imagining that they had seen its likeness in a human countenance, but could not remember where.
'You hoped,' answered the poet, faintly smiling, 'to find in me the likeness of the Great Stone Face.
"Our likenesses!" exclaimed Michel Ardan; "They are no more our likenesses than the Selenites are!