line


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to line: business line

line

(Ancestry), noun arrangement, avenue, beat, birth, blood, bloodline, channel, communication, course, derivation, descent, direction, dispatch, drift, epistle, stock, genealogy, heredity, idea, lane, letter, lineage, method, missive, nature, note, origin, parentage, path, progeny, race, railroad, road, route, scheme, sort, succession, system, tendency, track, trail, transportation, way
Associated concepts: descendant, direct line, maternal line, paternal line

line

(Business), noun activity, airline, avocation, bus line, calling, career, chain, employment, livelihood, occupation, profession, pursuit, specialization, specialty, stock in trade, undertaking, vocation, work
See also: ancestry, birth, blood, bloodline, business, calling, career, chain, course, derivation, descent, direction, employment, family, lineage, merchandise, occupation, origin, parentage, policy, polity, post, posterity, progeny, pursuit, race, range, stock in trade, trade, work

LINE, descents. The series of persons who have descended from a common ancestor, placed one under the other, in the order of their birth. It connects successively all the relations by blood to each other. Vide Consanguinity; Degree.

 
³ A  ³
³ s  ³                     ÚÄ    6. Tritavus, Tritavia.
³ c  ³                     ÃÄ    5. Atavus, Atavia.
³ e  ³                     ÃÄ    4. Abavus, Abavia.
³ n  ³ Great grand-   ³    ³
³ d Ä´ father, great  ÃÄ   ÃÄ    3. Proavus, Proavia.
³ i  ³ grandmother,   ³    ³
³ n  ³                     ³
³ g  ³ Grand father,  ³    ³
³    ³ grandmother    ÃÄ   ÃÄ    2. Avus, Avia.
³ l  ³                     ³
³ i  ³ Father, mother      ÃÄ    1. Pater, Mater.
³ n  ³                     ³
³ e  ³                     ³

     EGO. ÃÄ EGO. ³ D ³ ³ ³ e ³ ³ ³ s ³ Son. ÃÄ 1. Filius. ³ c ³ Grandson ÃÄ 2. Nepos, Nepti. ³ e ³ Great Grandson. ÃÄ 3. Pronepos, Proneptis. ³ n ³ ÃÄ 4. Abnepos, Abneptis. ³ d ³ ÃÄ 5. Adnepos, Adneptis. ³ i ³ ÃÄ 6. Trinepos, Trineptis. ³ n ³ ³ g ³ ³ ³ ³ L ³ ³ i ³ ³ n ³ ³ e ³

     2. The line is either direct or collateral. The direct line is composed of all the persons who are descended from each other. If, in the direct line, any one person is assumed the propositus, in order to count from him upwards and downwards, the line will be divided into two parts, the ascending and descending lines. The ascending line is that, which counting from the propositus, ascends to his ancestors, to his father, grandfather, great-grandfather, &c. The descending line, is that which, counting from the same person, descends to his children, grandchildren, great-grand-children, &c. The preceding table is an example.
     3. The collateral line considered by itself, and in relation to the common ancestor, is a direct line; it becomes collateral when placed along side of another line below the common ancestor, in whom both lines unite for example:

     Common ancestor.
     O
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     Direct ³ ³ Collateral
     line. o o line.
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     O o
     Ego.

     4. These two lines are independent of each other; they have no connexion, except by their union in the person of the common ancestor. This reunion is what forms the relation among the persons composing the two lines.
     5. A line is also paternal or maternal. In the examination of a person's ascending line, the line ascends first to his father, next to his paternal grandfather, his paternal great-grandfather, &c. so on from father to father; this is called the paternal line. Another line will be found to ascend from the same person to his mother, his maternal grandmother, and so from mother to mother; this is the maternal line. These lines, however, do not take in all the ascendants, there are many others who must be imagined. The number of ascendants is double at each degree, as is shown by the following table:

     ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     F ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³ ³
     t ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³
     ÚÄÄOÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     P ³ O ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ t ³ ³
     t ³ h ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ r ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ ³ ³
     a ³ L ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ i ³
     ³ n ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     L ³ e ³ ³
     i ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ Ego. OÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ O ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ t ³
     a ³ h ÚÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ e ³ ³
     ³ r ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     l ³ ³ ³ ³
     i ³ l ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ i ³ ³
     e ³ n ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ e ³
     ÀÄÄÄoÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     o ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³ ³
     e ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o

     Vide 2 Bl. Com. 200, b. 2, c. 14; Poth. Des Successions, ch. 1, art. 3, Sec. 2; and article Ascendants.

LINE, measures. A line is a lineal measure containing the one twelfth part of a on inch.

LINE, estates. The division between two estates. Limit; border; boundary.
     2. When a line is mentioned in a deed as ending at a particular monument, (q.v.) it is to be extended in the direction called for, without regard to distance, until it reach the boundary. 1 Taylor, 110, 303 2 Hawks, 219; 3 Hawks, 21; 2 Taylor, 1. And a marked line is to be adhered to although it depart from the course. 7 Wheat. 7; 2 Overt. 304; 3 Call, 239; 7 Monr. 333; 2 Bibb, 261; 4 Bibb, 503; 4 Monr. 29; see further, 2 Dana, 2; 6 Wend. 467; 1 Bibb, 466; 1 Marsh. 382; 3 Marsh. 382; 3 Murph. 82; 13 Pick. 145; 13 Wend. 300; 5 J. J. Marsh. 587.
     3. Where a number of persons settle simultaneously or at short intervals in the same neighborhood, and their tracts, if extended in certain directions, would overlap each other, the settlers sometimes by agreement determine upon dividing lines, which are called consentible lines. These lines, when fairly agreed upon, have been sanctioned by the courts; and such agreements are conclusive upon all persons claiming under the parties to them with notice, but not upon bona fide purchasers for a valuable consideration without notice, actual or constructive. 5 S. & R. 273; 9 W. & S. 66; 3 S & R. 323; 5 Binn. 129; 10 Watts, 324; 17 S. &. R. 57; Jones, L. 0. T.
     4. Lines fixed by compact between nations are binding on their citizens and subjects. 11 Pet. 209; 1 Overt. 269; 1 Ves. sen., Rep. 450; 1 Atk. R. 2; 1 Ch. Cas. 85; 1 P. Wms. 723727; 2 Atk. R. 592; 1 Vern. 48; 1 Ves. 19; 2 Ves. 284; 3 S. & R. 331.

References in classic literature ?
These lines run whole, and whirling out: come in broken, and dragging slow.
Here, as so often elsewhere in the "Odyssey," the appropriation of an Iliadic line which is not quite appropriate puzzles the reader.
There were two men in it, and though it was a good mile away, I made out one of them to be Big Alec; and ere the skiff returned to shore I made out enough more to know that the Greek had set his line.
So long as he advances, the line will not fire, - why should it?
Personally, he now inclines to the opinion of the Sphere that the Straight Lines are in many important respects superior to the Circles.
Their line gets hitched across your mast, and overturns you, or it catches somebody in the boat, and either throws them into the water, or cuts their face open.
(To the Boy:) Tell me, boy, do you assert that a double space comes from a double line? Remember that I am not speaking of an oblong, but of a figure equal every way, and twice the size of this--that is to say of eight feet; and I want to know whether you still say that a double square comes from double line?
A little later the regiment was ordered out of line to relieve the congested front, and through some misplay in the game of battle was not again under fire.
After dark that night he circled the flanks of both armies and passed through the British out-guards and into the British lines. No man saw him come.
At Grunth also some apprehension and alarm could be felt, but the nearer Prince Andrew came to the French lines the more confident was the appearance of our troops.
Furthermore, lines two and three, four and five, six and seven, have the same tones on the even syllables.
This chart divides the ocean into districts of five degrees of latitude by five degrees of longitude; perpendicularly through each of which districts are twelve columns for the twelve months; and horizontally through each of which districts are three lines; one to show the number of days that have been spent in each month in every district, and the two others to show the number of days in which whales, sperm or right, have been seen.