line

(redirected from lines of flight)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

line

(Ancestry), noun arrangement, avenue, beat, birth, blood, bloodline, channel, communication, course, derivation, descent, direction, dispatch, drift, epistle, stock, genealogy, heredity, idea, lane, letter, lineage, method, missive, nature, note, origin, parentage, path, progeny, race, railroad, road, route, scheme, sort, succession, system, tendency, track, trail, transportation, way
Associated concepts: descendant, direct line, maternal line, paternal line

line

(Business), noun activity, airline, avocation, bus line, calling, career, chain, employment, livelihood, occupation, profession, pursuit, specialization, specialty, stock in trade, undertaking, vocation, work
See also: ancestry, birth, blood, bloodline, business, calling, career, chain, course, derivation, descent, direction, employment, family, lineage, merchandise, occupation, origin, parentage, policy, polity, post, posterity, progeny, pursuit, race, range, stock in trade, trade, work

LINE, descents. The series of persons who have descended from a common ancestor, placed one under the other, in the order of their birth. It connects successively all the relations by blood to each other. Vide Consanguinity; Degree.

 
³ A  ³
³ s  ³                     ÚÄ    6. Tritavus, Tritavia.
³ c  ³                     ÃÄ    5. Atavus, Atavia.
³ e  ³                     ÃÄ    4. Abavus, Abavia.
³ n  ³ Great grand-   ³    ³
³ d Ä´ father, great  ÃÄ   ÃÄ    3. Proavus, Proavia.
³ i  ³ grandmother,   ³    ³
³ n  ³                     ³
³ g  ³ Grand father,  ³    ³
³    ³ grandmother    ÃÄ   ÃÄ    2. Avus, Avia.
³ l  ³                     ³
³ i  ³ Father, mother      ÃÄ    1. Pater, Mater.
³ n  ³                     ³
³ e  ³                     ³

     EGO. ÃÄ EGO. ³ D ³ ³ ³ e ³ ³ ³ s ³ Son. ÃÄ 1. Filius. ³ c ³ Grandson ÃÄ 2. Nepos, Nepti. ³ e ³ Great Grandson. ÃÄ 3. Pronepos, Proneptis. ³ n ³ ÃÄ 4. Abnepos, Abneptis. ³ d ³ ÃÄ 5. Adnepos, Adneptis. ³ i ³ ÃÄ 6. Trinepos, Trineptis. ³ n ³ ³ g ³ ³ ³ ³ L ³ ³ i ³ ³ n ³ ³ e ³

     2. The line is either direct or collateral. The direct line is composed of all the persons who are descended from each other. If, in the direct line, any one person is assumed the propositus, in order to count from him upwards and downwards, the line will be divided into two parts, the ascending and descending lines. The ascending line is that, which counting from the propositus, ascends to his ancestors, to his father, grandfather, great-grandfather, &c. The descending line, is that which, counting from the same person, descends to his children, grandchildren, great-grand-children, &c. The preceding table is an example.
     3. The collateral line considered by itself, and in relation to the common ancestor, is a direct line; it becomes collateral when placed along side of another line below the common ancestor, in whom both lines unite for example:

     Common ancestor.
     O
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     Direct ³ ³ Collateral
     line. o o line.
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     O o
     Ego.

     4. These two lines are independent of each other; they have no connexion, except by their union in the person of the common ancestor. This reunion is what forms the relation among the persons composing the two lines.
     5. A line is also paternal or maternal. In the examination of a person's ascending line, the line ascends first to his father, next to his paternal grandfather, his paternal great-grandfather, &c. so on from father to father; this is called the paternal line. Another line will be found to ascend from the same person to his mother, his maternal grandmother, and so from mother to mother; this is the maternal line. These lines, however, do not take in all the ascendants, there are many others who must be imagined. The number of ascendants is double at each degree, as is shown by the following table:

     ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     F ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³ ³
     t ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³
     ÚÄÄOÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     P ³ O ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ t ³ ³
     t ³ h ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ r ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ ³ ³
     a ³ L ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ i ³
     ³ n ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     L ³ e ³ ³
     i ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ Ego. OÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ O ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ t ³
     a ³ h ÚÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ e ³ ³
     ³ r ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     l ³ ³ ³ ³
     i ³ l ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ i ³ ³
     e ³ n ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ e ³
     ÀÄÄÄoÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     o ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³ ³
     e ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o

     Vide 2 Bl. Com. 200, b. 2, c. 14; Poth. Des Successions, ch. 1, art. 3, Sec. 2; and article Ascendants.

LINE, measures. A line is a lineal measure containing the one twelfth part of a on inch.

LINE, estates. The division between two estates. Limit; border; boundary.
     2. When a line is mentioned in a deed as ending at a particular monument, (q.v.) it is to be extended in the direction called for, without regard to distance, until it reach the boundary. 1 Taylor, 110, 303 2 Hawks, 219; 3 Hawks, 21; 2 Taylor, 1. And a marked line is to be adhered to although it depart from the course. 7 Wheat. 7; 2 Overt. 304; 3 Call, 239; 7 Monr. 333; 2 Bibb, 261; 4 Bibb, 503; 4 Monr. 29; see further, 2 Dana, 2; 6 Wend. 467; 1 Bibb, 466; 1 Marsh. 382; 3 Marsh. 382; 3 Murph. 82; 13 Pick. 145; 13 Wend. 300; 5 J. J. Marsh. 587.
     3. Where a number of persons settle simultaneously or at short intervals in the same neighborhood, and their tracts, if extended in certain directions, would overlap each other, the settlers sometimes by agreement determine upon dividing lines, which are called consentible lines. These lines, when fairly agreed upon, have been sanctioned by the courts; and such agreements are conclusive upon all persons claiming under the parties to them with notice, but not upon bona fide purchasers for a valuable consideration without notice, actual or constructive. 5 S. & R. 273; 9 W. & S. 66; 3 S & R. 323; 5 Binn. 129; 10 Watts, 324; 17 S. &. R. 57; Jones, L. 0. T.
     4. Lines fixed by compact between nations are binding on their citizens and subjects. 11 Pet. 209; 1 Overt. 269; 1 Ves. sen., Rep. 450; 1 Atk. R. 2; 1 Ch. Cas. 85; 1 P. Wms. 723727; 2 Atk. R. 592; 1 Vern. 48; 1 Ves. 19; 2 Ves. 284; 3 S. & R. 331.

References in periodicals archive ?
Our colleagues appropriately drew attention to the need to move further in the analyses of lines of flight. We know and participate in several groups and social movements as part of their struggles and creations, but there are so many more to learn about.
In a global context where a new politics of exclusion is growing simultaneously with increased levels of displacement and refugee numbers, how might we invent new weapons, or co-invent lines of flight, in order to combat such exclusion?
It seems as if Deleuze's proposition in terms of lines of flight turning into lines of "abolition, annihilation, self-destruction, Ahab, Ahab ..." (23) is that such becomings are as much the result of the material, the heterogeneities, multiplicities and the relations that comprise their intensity as they are properties of the lines of flight in general.
It traces lines of flight and invents new possibilities of life.
As a local observation, the point is fairly made but in Lawrence's oeuvre more generally the hyperbolic expression of this moment is balanced both by his foreground realism and his strong sense of literary form while, as the term "uncharacteristically" suggests, it is surely Deleuze and Guattari who leave the readers with the most open-ended commitment to disruptive "lines of flight."
Deleuze and Guattari use the terms "territorialization" and "deterritorialization" to capture these dimensions and to accentuate motion in any direction, lines of flight, comings and goings, from any initiating point.
Teachers and students developing lines of flight in their own individual practice and teachers using cultural studies in their practice and people writing in curriculum studies about fusion cuisine and philosophy, and vampires and Deleuze, and the holocaust and curriculum, and horror films and identity formation, and Harry Potter and children's literature and cyborgs and curriculum and Star Trek and education and McDonalds and kids and violence and flagpoles and, and, and ...
Lines of Flight is organized around close readings of Pynchon's novels--short stories are not discussed, nor are Pynchon's scant essays and reviews given any attention--proceeding chronologically from V.
Shooting wood pigeons on flight lines, as they move between feeding or roosting grounds, can also be productive but requires plenty of patience and reconnaissance to determine where the lines of flight are.
In so doing, we might move past the search for closure in the novel's final pages and explore the passageways and lines of flight Marian's critique opens.
From the rhizomatic perspective, the book has neither subject nor object, constituted only by lines of articulation (segmentarity/strata/territorialities) on one hand, and, on the other, by lines of flight (movements of deterritorialization) and destratification) These lines and their "measurable speeds" constitute a "machine assemblage" orientated to those "strata" which inevitable make it into a kind of organism/a signifying totality/a determination attributable to a subject, and equally orientated towards a "body without organs" which infinitely breaks down the organism, frees/circulates a-signifying particles, pure intensities and creates subjects to whom it allows no more than a name, as the trace of an intensity.