listen

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listen

verb ausculate, be attentive, concentrate on, give one's attention to, hark, hear, hearken, heed, intercept, listen in, monitor, obey, overhear, pick up
See also: attend, concentrate, eavesdrop, hear, heed, monitor, obey
References in periodicals archive ?
ListenWiFi, Listen Technologies' pro audio streaming solution will become Audio Everywhere from Listen Technologies, offering a plug and play, low-latency solution for assistive listening that can operate on a venue's existing wireless network.
In this article, we describe a model of L2 listening and related research to guide the design and delivery of research-informed listening instruction that extends the listening stage by focusing on the listening process.
Calling the field's tendency to overlook listening a "curious oversight," especially "given the centrality of listening to communicative, experiential and public life," Lacey (2013) challenged scholars to dispense with the idea that listening is associated with passivity (p.
Add to this the fact that most of us are untrained listeners to begin with (only 2 percent of the population has received any formal listening training) and you have a ready-made prescription for conversational problems.
In 'Ways of Listening', Lacy explores the divergent positions between listening as a private and collective act, which provides a solid basis for the final section, 'Listening in the Public Sphere'.
To discover our own potentialities and to see the precious gifts that we are so fortunate to possess, listening alone can explore as we journey through the challenges of life.
Listening is a popular subject among scholars of interpersonal communication for a number of reasons.
Globally, listening has never been more important in a continued effort to listen and manage through cultural bias and geographic barriers.
In the study the participants reported weekly average active listening to music of 4.
The Or Ha-Haim, perhaps, views listening as an active process.
Today, listening is recognized as an active process, critical to L2 acquisition, and deserving systematic development as a separate skill (Morley, 2001).
The object of our research has been the learners' perceptions of expedience to individual listening to podcasts.