litigable

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litigable

that may be the subject of litigation.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
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By saying that you must know if your company is "willing" to litigate, I mean that even if you believe you are able to litigate an issue, you must know if the potential risks of litigation--including but not limited to the risk of losing--are such that your company is willing to bear the economic consequences of the tax, interest, and any penalty that may be asserted by the IRS as well as the publicity and reputational risks to the company of litigating.
If this is the case, then it will pay for B to litigate only if the possibility exists to overturn legal precedent, resulting in an economically efficient court ruling.
Do these actions establish momentum among lawyers who litigate against HMOs?
They say they are fully prepared to litigate this issue, but feel an effort to develop guidelines for degradables would be more effective.
Forer suggestes, for instance, that defamation be defined as "a statement that taken as a whole makes a verifiably false charge that the subject committed a specific criminal or other degrading act." Lawyers can find much to litigate about here.
A member of a dissolved limited liability corporation who is not a lawyer cannot litigate on behalf of the dissolved LLC.
Supreme Court California decision will certainly have an impact as Illinois courts litigate our present law.
-Attorneys who are practicing Bankruptcy and also want to litigate mortgage issues in the bankruptcy forum for homeowners
Webb found that when this option was taken out of the picture, attorneys used their skills as problem solvers to collaborate and settle cases rather than litigate. In the 1990s practitioners in California went a step further, using an interdisciplinary team comprising an attorney and a mental health coach for each spouse, a financial specialist and, if there are children, a child advocate.
The City has consistently denied that its design and construction actions were improper, but it was not necessary to litigate that issue in light of the Court's ruling.