litter

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litter

the offence committed where a person throws down, drops or otherwise deposits any litter in any place to which this law applies and leaves it. The law applies to any place in the area of a principal litter authority which is open to the air, unless the public does not have access to it, with or without payment. It is immaterial whether the litter is deposited on land or in water. Litter expressly includes the discarded ends of cigarettes, cigars and like products, and discarded chewing-gum and the discarded remains of other products designed for chewing.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
(2006) showed that litter size in Djallonke sheep was slightly higher in the rainy season and lower in the dry one.
The fattening and slaughter values of the tested gilts in relation to litter size are shown in Table 2.
Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the associations between capacitation status, variation of capacitation status, and litter size. The ability of individual analyzed parameters to predict litter size was evaluated by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves (litter size [greater than or equal to]11 or <11 [based on average litter size of Landrace pigs], litter size [greater than or equal to]12 or <12 (based on average litter size of Yorkshire pigs), and litter size [greater than or equal to]8 or <8 [based on average litter size of Duroc pigs]).
birth date) and litter size on yearling antler size suggests that it's unlikely that regulated sport hunting will change populationlevel antler size.
Although it is hypothesized that populations at their range limits have reduced reproductive output (Gaston, 2009; Sexton el al, 2009), theory predicts that expanding populations have relatively high reproductive rates (Philips el al., 2010) and empirical evidence suggests that litter size of European wild boar increases with latitude (Bywater el al, 2010).
The model also contained a covariate for litter size to control for its effect on the response variable, and evaluated with the age, total weight, and sex of fetus data from 21 known dams.
The average litter size increases with increasing female body mass (Rosell et al.
2003), breeding dates (Millar & McAdam 2001), litter size (Innes & Millar 1987, Ivanter & Kukhareva 2008, Balciauskas et al.
Suids have the highest reproductive rate of any ungulate due to their short interbirth intervals, large litter size, and a young age at first reproduction (Eisenberg, 1981; Read and Harvey, 1989).