land

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land

n. real property, real estate (and all that grows thereon), and the right to minerals underneath and the airspace over it. It may include improvements like buildings, but not necessarily. The owner of the land may give a long-term (like 99 years) lease to another with the right to build on it. The improvement is a "leasehold" for ownership of the right to use--without ownership of--the underlying land. The right to use the air above a parcel of land is subject to height limitations by local ordinance, state or federal law.

(See: real property, real estate)

land

noun property, real estate, seisin, terrain, tract
Associated concepts: abutting land, adjacent land, agreeeent to sell land, alienation of land, appurtenance to land, common lands, condemnation of land, contiguous land, contract of sale of land, convey an interest in land, covenants running with the land, easement, easement running with the land, equitable interest in land, high land, immrovements upon land, interest in land, land contract, land grant, land tax, lease of land, lien on land, raw land, right of way, subdivision of land, suit to recover land, survey of land, title in land, title in fee, trespass on land tract, undiiided land, unimproved land, vacant land, waste lands
See also: alight, circuit, curtilage, demesne, domain, estate, fee, freehold, holding, immovable, parcel, premises, property, real estate, realm, realty, region, territory

land

not only the physical surface of land but everything growing on or underneath that surface, anything permanently affixed to the surface (such as a building) and the airspace above that surface. It includes not only the soil or earth but always any water, a pond, for example, being regarded as land covered by water. Land may be divisible both horizontally and vertically; thus, ownership of the surface may be vested in one person while ownership of mines and minerals are vested in another. It is perfectly possible to have ‘flying freeholds’, where ownership of different storeys of the same building are vested in different persons. Scotland has a developed law of the tenement which has been given an even more coherent statutory basis in the twenty-first century.

LAND. This term comprehends any found, soil or earth whatsoever, as meadows, pastures, woods, waters, marshes, furze and heath. It has an indefinite extent upwards as well as downwards; therefore land, legally includes all houses and other buildings standing or built on it; and whatever is in a direct line between the surface and the centre of the earth, such as mines of metals and fossils. 1 Inst. 4 a; Wood's Inst. 120; 2 B1. Com. 18; 1 Cruise on Real Prop. 58. In a more confined sense, the word land is said to denote "frank tenement at the least." Shep. To. 92. In this sense, then, leaseholds cannot be said to be included under the word lands. 8 Madd. Rep. 635. The technical sense of the word land is farther explained by Sheppard, in his Touch. p. 88, thus: "if one be seised of some lands in fee, and possessed of other lands for years, all in one parish, and he grant all his lands in that parish (without naming them) in fee simple or for life; by this grant shall pass no, more but the lands he hath in fee simple." It is also said that land in its legal acceptation means arable land. 11 Co. 55 a. See also Cro. Car. 293; 2 P. Wms. 458, n.; 5 Ves. 476; 20 Vin. Ab. 203.
     2. Land, as above observed, includes in general all the buildings erected upon it; 9 Day, R. 374; but to this general rule there are some exceptions. It is true, that if a stranger voluntarily erect buildings on another's land, they will belong to the owner of the land, and will become a part of it; 16 Mass. R. 449; yet cases are, not wanting where it has been decided that such an erection, under peculiar circumstances, would be considered as personal property. 4 Mass. R. 514; 8 Pick. R. 283, 402; 5 Pick, R. 487; 6 N. H. Rep. 555; 2 Fairf. R. 371; 1 Dana, R. 591; 1 Burr. 144.

References in periodicals archive ?
Living off the land isn't just hard work all the time.
When we were still living off the land, they were just finding out about the riches they could take to better themselves by moving our people to reserves and promising things to all First Nations that never happened.
If you've ever indulged fantasies of selling off your belongings, moving to the country, and living off the land, Eleanor Agnew's new book Back from the Land: How Young Americans went to Nature in the 1970s and Why They Came Back (Ivan R.
Thoreau's experience living off the land around Walden Pond in Massachusetts has global appeal.
But for most of a decade, the Redlichs are obliged to make their living off the land that will never be theirs, but that Jettel gradually learns to love.
In the 1930s, the United States was a nation of farmers, with a quarter of American workers living off the land.
De la Fuente notes the importance in La Rioja of the merced, a colonial land grant that by the mid-nineteenth century produced the comuneros, the people living off the land comprising the merced.
Bush said before the president moves to remove land from entry, Congress should be consulted along with stakeholders who may make a living off the land in question.
The ranching way of life - living off the land, turning grass into money (the cow, according to Flynn and other ranchers, is just the middle man) - is becoming unsustainable in parts of Montana.
This country was founded by living off the land," he says.
45pm This coming-of-age drama sees three teenage boys seek independence and freedom from their dysfunctional families by constructing a house in the woods and living off the land.
The two laptops and a desktop computer Anita bought with Paul's money will transform lives and show the pupils in village schools out there that there is another way to survive other than living off the land.