Lodger

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Lodger

An occupant of a portion of a dwelling, such as a hotel or boardinghouse, who has mere use of the premises without actual or exclusive possession thereof. Anyone who lives or stays in part of a building that is operated by another and who does not have control over the rooms therein.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

LODGER. One who has a right to inhabit another man's house. He has not the same right as a tenant; and is not entitled to the same notice to quit. Woodf. L. &_T. 177. See 7 Mann. & Gr. 87; S. C. 49 E. C. L. R. 85, 151, and article Inmate.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
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Speaking of that, two brothers from the Merton lodge are coming over to us next week to do some business in this quarter."
"I would say, Eminent Bodymaster, that if a man should be wanted I should take it as an honour to be chosen to help the lodge."
"I would move," said the secretary, Harraway, a vulture-faced old graybeard who sat near the chairman, "that Brother McMurdo should wait until it is the good pleasure of the lodge to employ him."
He was struck down doing the work of the lodge, and it is for us to see that she is not the loser."
The Master of Life has said to me, Live alone; your lodge shall be the forest; the roof of your wigwam, the clouds.
He does not say, My lodge is empty and there is room for another; but shall I build, and will the virgin show me near what spring she would dwell?
In this manner had he wooed her from the lodge of her father, and it was to listen to similar pictures of the renown and deeds of the greatest brave in her tribe, that she had shut her ears to the tender tales of so many of the Sioux youths.
As the Teton turned to leave his lodge, in the manner just mentioned, he found this unexpected and half-forgotten object before him.
Though not a hand had been extended to greet him, nor yet an eye had condescended to watch his movements, he had also entered the lodge, as though impelled by a fate to whose decrees he submitted, seemingly, without a struggle.
The whole shuddering group of spectators glided from the lodge like troubled sprites; and Duncan thought that he and the yet throbbing body of the victim of an Indian judgment had now become its only tenants.
When at the distance of a few hundred feet from the lodges the newly arrived warriors halted.
He followed the crowd, which drew nigh the lodges, gloomy and sullen, like any other multitude that had been disappointed in an execution.