loiter


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loiter

v. to linger or hang around in a public place or business where one has no particular or legal purpose. In many states, cities, and towns there are statutes or ordinances against loitering by which the police can arrest someone who refuses to "move along." There is a question as to whether such laws are constitutional. However, there is often another criminal statute or ordinance which can be applied specifically to control aggressive begging, soliciting prostitution, drug dealing, blocking entries to stores, public drunkenness, or being a public nuisance.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
it would loiter for 30 minutes at around 750 ft, using its laser-radar to search for targets, compare their responses with memorised signatures and attack with a tri-mode warhead.
I did not restart the loitered engine because we already were stretching to make the on-station time, and the caution light appeared to be insignificant.
Between editions, newsboys would loiter in the streets or in the "news alleys" outside the pressrooms.
Justice Anthony Kennedy expressed his agreement with much of the plurality opinion but did not join the part that endorsed the "freedom to loiter." He pointed out that some police orders might "subject a citizen to prosecution for disobeying whether or not the citizen knows why the order is given."(25)
In fact, the Court held that the freedom to loiter for innocent purposes is part of the "liberty" protected by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S.
Justices Stevens, Souter, and Ginsburg based their opinion invalidating the gang-loitering ordinance on the "freedom to loiter for innocent purposes."(51) This aspect of liberty guaranteed by the due process clause does more than protect the personal enjoyment one experiences when freely strolling the streets.
(1) It is unlawful for any person to loiter or prowl in a place, at a time or in a manner not usual for law-abiding individuals, under circumstances that warrant a justifiable and reasonable alarm or immediate concern for the safety of persons or property in the vicinity.
The city was arresting homeless people under a law which made it illegal to "stand, loiter, or walk upon any street or sidewalk in the city so as to obstruct free passage over." In 1992, U.S.
"Since it is no longer a crime to loiter, the only thing that can be charged against that person is the violation of a city or municipal ordinance.
Why the poor loiter. The poor loiter mainly because many of them are jobless and underemployed, and to keep themselves busy looking for any opportunity to make money.
Washington, Jan 9 ( ANI ): Madonna has revealed that she used to 'loiter like a weirdo' in front of the building where Wallis Simpson, the subject of her directorial debut 'W.E' used to live.
It is built to creep into enemy airspace, " loiter" for as long as necessary hunting for targets, and then dive to decimate the chosen one.