loiter

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loiter

v. to linger or hang around in a public place or business where one has no particular or legal purpose. In many states, cities, and towns there are statutes or ordinances against loitering by which the police can arrest someone who refuses to "move along." There is a question as to whether such laws are constitutional. However, there is often another criminal statute or ordinance which can be applied specifically to control aggressive begging, soliciting prostitution, drug dealing, blocking entries to stores, public drunkenness, or being a public nuisance.

loiter

verb be idle, be vagrant, cessare, hang around, idle, linger, move aimlessly, pass time in idleness, poke, stand around, tarry, wander aimlessly
Associated concepts: vagrancy
See also: delay, pause, procrastinate, prowl
References in periodicals archive ?
Once that was finished, Patel went to see the city's police chief and asked for the department's help in getting rid of the loiterers constantly around his store.
Human disturbance in Griffith Park's interior comes in a variety forms, including hikers, joggers, dog-walkers, and horseback riders, as well as loiterers and transients who set up small encampments in the park's canyons and near parking lots.
She said the guards, who she described as ''hired loiterers,'' have prevented her from visiting her imprisoned husband, her parents and her son who is under their care.
The Port Authority said that the proceeds will be put towards a planned overhaul of the bus terminal, which has long been derided by commuters for its grungy appearance, loiterers and confusing layout.
There was no lack of loiterers who followed Kalman and the soldiers.
A couple of years before, he had hired a helicopter to harass the crowd outside his opening at Midway Contemporary in Minneapolis with a spotlight, appeasing the loiterers with free aviator sunglasses.
At facilities in downtown areas, we often place lights on the outside of garages, which has helped to keep away loiterers such as homeless people.
Operators can set the system to detect motion, breaches, left-behind objects and even loiterers.
However, the loiterers gathered here looked as though they were unemployed, and were out to get what they could, through fair or foul means.
Dianna Ferguson-Mosley, head of the Indianapolis Police Department's robbery division, commended businesses that took steps to thwart robbers: watching for loiterers (potential robbers), and modernizing video surveillance equipment.
A jury awarded $10 million against a security firm that supplied a lobby guard who did nothing while loiterers harassed a tenant and shot him six times.
Though loiterers are not welcomed, there's nothing to say an attacker couldn't simply check into the hotel, thereby gaining full access and guest privileges to target facilities.