loquacious

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Related to loquacity: reticence
References in periodicals archive ?
He threatened to sue Robert Craft unless he removed a paragraph on Berlin's loquacity from one of his Stravinsky books, Dialogues and a Diary (1963).
To justify this loquacity, I cite the fact that it has been several issues since I wrote an editorial for the JP, so I'm just catching up.
She notes that the broadsides examined here "feature stories of witchcraft, husband-murder, and scolding--transgressions that intertwine the fears of female power, musical and acoustic disorder, loquacity, and social imbalance" (4).
Walsers digressive writing and his narrator's expansive loquacity draws attention to just how much of the conversation the narrator takes up, inviting a spatial metaphor for a diegetically temporal experience.
True, the rule on judicial affidavit would abbreviate proceedings by curbing the loquacity of lawyers.
But if Macbeth balks at the knowledge, it is registered in the irrepressible loquacity of his inner voice, which cries with relentless and repetitive insistence "'Sleep no more: / Macbeth does murder sleep,' the innocent sleep" (2.
The Nawab Bahadur's fractured syntax and loquacity are at odds with Ronny and Adela's terseness; their phrases are rendered as sentences, marked with periods, while his are separated by ellipses, suggesting incomplete thoughts, discontinuity, and internal fragmentation.
Fred Stewart, exec of the Renewal Fellowship, and I disagree on many, many things, but that's never stopped us from enjoying each other's company, often and preferably with a pint each to lubricate our heated loquacity.
Elaine's belief in the loquacity of her dead body calls attention to the paradoxical logic feminist critics have long identified in anorexic practices: while self-starvation may be construed "as a material and discursive process of producing an identity for oneself," it is also, as Helen Malson points out, a means "of destroying oneself both literally and metaphorically.
Joyce began Ulysses here, promoted the fiction of his friend Ettore Schmitz (whose pseudonym Italo Svevo disguised his Jewish heredity), and from the city's polyglot loquacity wrested the verbal "chaosmos" of Finnegans Wake.
bubbling loquacity unwonted to his habitual taciturnity, a
Ambrosio is a heck of a teller, a natural ham (nicely complementing his artisanal cheese) whose fits of emotion and loquacity are delightfully barmy.