magic

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magic

adjective by chance occurrence, coincidental, fortunate, lucky, out of the ordinary, magical, miraculous, mystic, mystical, mysterious, occult, sorcery, supernatural, uncanny, under a charm, under a spell, unusual, wizardly, wonderful
See also: prestidigitation
References in classic literature ?
I said, all right; then the thing for us to do was to go for the magicians.
You know it is very hard to change the color of a prince," said the Doctor--"one of the hardest things a magician can do.
The young man never halted in his flight until he reached the dwelling of the wise magician who had taught him the speech of birds.
It seemed intolerable that I should endure existence subject to the arbitrary visitations of a Magician who could thus play tricks with one's very stomach.
It is an island covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and a goddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks after the bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keep heaven and earth asunder.
I tell you," one of them was saying, "that if Coysel predicted that, 'tis as good as true; I know nothing about it, but I have heard say that he's not only an astrologer, but a magician.
The leader of the hostile party stood in the centre of the circle, while the route of monsters cowered around him, like evil spirits in the presence of a dread magician.
Everything is different in the dark," said a third voice, that of the man who called himself a magician.
My opinion is," exclaimed Jehanne de la Tarme, "that it would be better for the louts of Paris, if this little magician were put to bed on a fagot than on a plank.
One year you told me about them; I think it took you a whole year, Unc, to say as much as I've just said about the Crooked Magician and his wife.
But the seeming godly father was a wicked magician.
Shall I ask you whether God is a magician, and of a nature to appear insidiously now in one shape, and now in another--sometimes himself changing and passing into many forms, sometimes deceiving us with the semblance of such transformations; or is he one and the same immutably fixed in his own proper image?