magistracy

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magistracy

1 the office or function of a MAGISTRATE.
2 magistrates collectively.
3 the district under the jurisdiction of a magistrate.

MAGISTRACY, mun. law. In its most enlarged signification, this term includes all officers, legislative, executive, and judicial. For example, in most of the state constitutions will be found this provision; "the powers of the government are divided into three distinct departments, and each of these is confided to a separate magistracy, to wit: those which are legislative, to one; those which are executive, to another; and those which are judiciary, to another." In a more confined sense, it signifies the body of officers whose duty it is to put the laws in force; as, judges, justices of the peace, and the like. In a still narrower sense it is employed to designate the body of justices of peace. It is also used for the office of a magistrate.

References in periodicals archive ?
The sale of magistracies began in the 1670s, when the government of the last Habsburg king, Charles II, introduced the measure in a desperate attempt to tap all possible sources of revenue.
The corregimiento of Quezaltenango, the high magistracies of Huehuetenango, Atitlan, Suchitepequez, Verapaz (all in modern-day Guatemala) and San Salvador and the governorship of Soconusco (the coast of modern-day Chiapas)(12) sold for between 4,000 and 6,000 pesos.
These appointments were an early example of the Dukes' gradual departure from the Florentine tradition of filling key judicial and administrative magistracies with men serving short and rotating terms by a process of extraction overseen by the office of the Tratte.
Beyond lineage, the prerequisite for political participation in Ducal Tuscany was personal membership in the Council of 200, the assembly drawn from those who had passed scrutiny for magistracies. Most Captains were members of the 200 before joining the Bigallo.
Renaissance Italian judicial systems have been described from many angles: law codes, magistracies, criminals, punishments, and extra-judicial settlements.
New magistracies were created for the purpose of supervising the judicial, fiscal, and economic affairs of the mainland, yet, as Ferraro emphasizes, the pragmatic Venetian rulers always understood and acted upon the principle that their hegemony "could only rest on collaboration with local powers" (18).
Outside foreign affairs, above all in giving directions both to dependent cities and Florentine magistracies on behalf of petitioners, Lorenzo more or less has his own way in these 115 letters, as when he intervenes with the appropriate officials at the request of Arezzo to have this favorite Medici city made exempt from a new tax (V, 251-2).
Two concluding chapters describe the executive magistracies that possessed certain judicial powers; and a sampling of court cases for the years 1425-28, from which the author draws conclusions about "philosophies of prosecution and profiles of criminality."