magnetic

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magnetic

adjective absorbing, alluring, appealing, arresting, attracting, attractive, beguiling, bewitching, charismatic, charming, compelling, dynamic, electric, electrical, enchanting, engaging, engrossing, enthralling, enticing, entrancing, exciting, fascinating, glamorous, gripping, hypnotic, interesting, inviting, irresistible, magnetized, mesmeric, persuasive, potent, powerful, provocative, tantalizing, tempting, winning
See also: attractive
References in periodicals archive ?
These studies indicate a tentative, yet positive relation between magnetic field therapy and relief of both migraine and tension headache pain.
No studies to date have examined the relation between magnetic field therapy and power.
Since magnetic field therapy is a form of alternative therapy, studies in which the relation between alternative therapies and power were explored are examined.
In summary, the literature supports tentative relations of magnetic field therapy to primary headache pain and power.
Does pain change overtime in adults with chronic primary headache who participate in a magnetic field therapy compared to a placebo therapy and a standard therapy?
Does power change over time in adults with chronic primary headache who participate in a magnetic field therapy compared to a placebo therapy and a standard therapy?
Research Question One: Does pain change over time in adults with chronic primary headache who participate in a magnetic field therapy compared to a placebo therapy and a standard therapy?
Research Question Two: Does power change over time in adults with chronic primary headache who participate in a magnetic field therapy compared to a placebo therapy and a standard therapy?
Participants in the magnetic field therapy group manifested the greatest degree of decrease in headache (60.2%), followed by the placebo group (47.9%) and the standard group (31.2%).
The relatively high response with magnetic field therapy, as well as with the placebo and standard therapy found in this study, can be explained through the principles of homeodynamics (Rogers, 1992).
Magnetic field therapy used in this study was based on Davis and Rawls' (1975, 1979) concepts of magnetic fields, where they specify the positive and negative poles of permanent magnets are different in their direction of motion.