magnetic

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magnetic

adjective absorbing, alluring, appealing, arresting, attracting, attractive, beguiling, bewitching, charismatic, charming, compelling, dynamic, electric, electrical, enchanting, engaging, engrossing, enthralling, enticing, entrancing, exciting, fascinating, glamorous, gripping, hypnotic, interesting, inviting, irresistible, magnetized, mesmeric, persuasive, potent, powerful, provocative, tantalizing, tempting, winning
See also: attractive
References in periodicals archive ?
In this research, we investigated the therapeutic effectiveness of pulsed magnetic field therapy as a conservative agent in CTS.
Pulsed magnetic field therapy in refractory neuropathic pain secondary to peripheral neuropathy: electrodiagnostic parameters--pilot study.
Because magnetic field therapy allows athletes to stay healthy with a minimum amount of time, administration, and expense (it can be used while the athlete is practicing or even competing), trainers and medical personnel would do well to investigate its potential use in their programs.
Key words Science of Unitary Human Beings, magnetic field therapy, pain, power
Magnetic field therapy is a noninvasive health promoting modality which has been used since ancient times.
Since the experiences of pain and power are different manifestations of well-being, which evolve through an individual's mutual process with the environment, the individual's choice of strategies to change pain and power must take into account different environmental factors such as magnetic field therapy.
This study explored the potential of magnetic field therapy as a nursing intervention, a manifestation of the environmental energy field, within the context of this human-environment patterning process.
Davis and Rawls' (1974) theory of magnetic fields provided the rationale for the magnetic field therapy.
Kim and Lee (1994) studied the relation between magnetic field therapy and pain in 23 individuals with primary dysmenorrhea who were randomly assigned to either a magnetic group ([n.