inclusion

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inclusion

noun all acceptance, all-embracing uniierse, all-encompassing universe, all facets, blanket analysis, broad analysis, compendious amount, comprehensive number, diverse mix, diverse mixture, every facet, every side, exhaustive approach, extensive analysis, full vision, mainstreaming everyone, sweeping analysis, total number, total scope, umbrella, universe, unlimited acceptance
Associated concepts: inclusion of children with disabilities, inclusionary approach
See also: acceptance, accession, addendum, admittance, affiliation, appendix, composition, coverage, insertion, scope
References in periodicals archive ?
The danger in mainstreaming organisations such as the Jamaat-ud-Dawa and Laskar-e-Jhangvi lay in such organisations legitimising themselves through the political process and then using that legitimacy and contingent political power to cover for their militant activities and violence.
The other argument against mainstreaming is a moral one primarily being that organisations and the people who run them are responsible for thousands of deaths and thus should not be allowed to operate freely without first a legal reckoning for their crimes.
FARC in Colombia, ETA in Spain and IRA in Ireland are a few of the recent mainstreaming success stories.
There were different ideas of the respondents towards the concept of gender mainstreaming.
Also it underlines the role of NGOs and GOs in promoting Gender Mainstreaming in different aspects of developmental programmes such as political, economic, and social aspects; for the sake of women empowerment in order to achieve sustainable development.
The study also helps identify issues facing the camp profession, such as mainstream camps' responsibility to serve campers with more severe disabling conditions and the role of specialized camps in the mainstreaming movement.
Studies of mainstreaming found that despite mainstreamed students' doing poorly on teacher-made tests in the regular classes and failing to do homework regularly (Truesdell, 1985), nearly three quarters of high school students with learning disabilities passed their mainstream classes, perhaps as a result of teachers' inflating the grades of these students (Zigmond, Levine, & Laurie, 1985).
One elementary school and two junior high schools with substantial academic mainstreaming for students with mild disabilities were identified by the Superintendent for Special Education in Queens, New York.