episode

(redirected from major depressive episode)
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Related to major depressive episode: Major Depressive Disorder

episode

noun chapter, circumstance, event, happening, incident, occasion, occurrence, sequel, short-lived event, sudden event
See also: event, experience, happening, incident, occasion, occurrence, scene
References in periodicals archive ?
MDD with postpartum onset is defined, in the DSM-IV-TR, as a major depressive episode with onset within 4 weeks of delivery.
The Test-Retest Levels of Agreement between First Rater and Second Rater for Current Major Depressive Episode First rater Second rater Depression No depression Depression 22 12 No depression 8 122 Simple agreement rates 87.8%.
While rates of depression were higher among unemployed and part-time workers, slightly more than half of the adults who reported major depressive episodes in the past year were employed on a full-time basis.
The most common sleep disturbance associated with a major depressive episode is insomnia; less frequently, individuals present with hypersomnia (APA, 2000a).
Eleven per cent of girls aged 15 to 17 had a major depressive episode during the year before the survey while boys of the same age were no more at risk than when they were 12 to 14 years of age.
(3) The full diagnostic criteria should be taken into account when diagnosing pediatric patients; however, the presentation of a major depressive episode in pediatric patients may differ from the presentation in adults.
Longer periods of maintenance therapy may decrease the likelihood of a major depressive episode relapse.
But the risk is among those with both posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive episode during pregnancy and is independent of pharmacotherapies for these two conditions, according to this prospective study involving more than 2,600 women.
* In 2012, there were 2.2 million youths aged 12 to 17 (9.1 percent) who had a major depressive episode (MDE) during the past year.
During a major depressive episode, a person experiences severe and persistent depression and loss of interest in everyday activities, often followed by problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration and self-image.
In any given year, 5-7% of the world's population experiences a major depressive episode, and one in six people will at some point suffer from the disease.
In fact, caring for relatives with bipolar disorder doubles the risk of recurrence of a major depressive episode in those with a preexisting diagnosis of major depressive disorder.

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