make

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make

v. 1) to create something. 2) to sign a check, promissory note, bill of exchange or some other note which guarantees, promises or orders payment of money. (See: maker, check, promissory note, bill of exchange)

make

verb accomplish, achieve, actualize, assemble, attain, author, beget, bring about, bring forth, bring into being, bring into existence, bring to effect, bring to pass, build, call into being, call into existence, carry into effect, carry into execution, cast, cause, cause to exist, coin, complete, compose, compound, concoct, constitute, constrain, construct, contrive, creare, create, develop, draft, draw up, effect, effectuate, efform, enact, engender, erect, establish, evolve, execute, fabricari, fabricate, facere, fashion, force, forge, form, formulate, frame, generate, give birth to, give origin to, give rise to, hammer out, hatch, have in production, improvise, initiate, institute, invent, kindle, machine, manufacture, model, mold, organize, originate, pattern, perform, piece together, prepare, produce, provide, put together, set up, shape, synthesize, think up, turn out, yield results
Associated concepts: make a decision, make a demand, make a motion, make an agreement, make an offer
See also: acquire, build, cause, color, compel, complexion, constrain, create, enforce, fabricate, forge, form, frame, gain, generate, impose, kind, manner, manufacture, occasion, originate, press, produce, realize, receive, require, style

TO MAKE. English law. To perform or execute; as to make his law, is to perform that law which a man had bound himself to do; that is, to clear himself of an action commenced against him, by his oath, and the oaths of his neighbors. Old Nat. Br. 161. To make default, is to fail to appear in proper time. To make oath, is to swear according to the form prescribed by law.

References in classic literature ?
We can't do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought to do it gladly.
I suppose I can't make you understand, but oh, I wish I could," he said earnestly.
You may make your mind easy about this contest, for no Phaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours.
They professed to be on an amicable errand, to make peace with the Crows, and set off in all haste, before night, to overtake them.
Come, make haste; the ferry boat will be off directly, and in three minutes you will be on the other side of the river.
Such things are great fun when you get used to them; besides, contriving sharpens your wits, and makes you feel as if you had more hands than most people.
But Aunt Myra spoke, and he could not resist the temptation to make light of her advice, and let Rose brave the cold.
The last time we heard of monks and priests they were the friends of the people, doing their best to teach them and make them happy.
Huber found it was with a caterpillar, which makes a very complicated hammock; for if he took a caterpillar which had completed its hammock up to, say, the sixth stage of construction, and put it into a hammock completed up only to the third stage, the caterpillar simply re-performed the fourth, fifth, and sixth stages of construction.
You didn't make any conditions while we were talking," said the scientist.
It was agreed, after consultation, that he should make the effort with old Antanas and with Jonas.
Wilson was informed that his witnesses had been delayed, but would arrive presently; but he rose and said he should probably not have occasion to make use of their testimony.