malcontent


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malcontent

noun agitator, anarchist, ardent chammion of change, brawler, caviler, censurer, complainant, complainer, critic, crusader, demonstrator, detractor, diehard, disputer, dissenter, dissentient, dissident, extremist, fanatic, faultfinder, fighter, fretter, griper, grumbler, heretic, homo rerum novarum cupidus, instigator, insubordinate, insurgent, insurrectionist, kicker, mutineer, nihilist, nonconformist, noncooperator, objector, obstructionist, petitioner, political agitator, protester, rabble-rouser, radical, reactionary, reactionist, rebel, recusant, reformer, renegade, repiner, resister, revolter, revolutionary, revolutionist, rioter, seditionary, seditionist, traitor, troublemaker, whiner, wrangler
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluate whether these complainers are born malcontents whose personalities are that way no matter what the environment; or whether a different, more positive environment would result in a behavioral change.
There's a reason certain athletes are known as malcontents.
They are generally good editions, albeit not always up to date with the most recent work, but acknowledgements of their textual contingency are only intermittent: Ryan has an acute sense of how editorial practice can affect the interpretation of The Malcontent, and Clare's account of the play's possible censorship is useful on the variants between (and even within) the three early issues; but nobody writing about The Insatiate Countess here seems to have endured even one sleepless night over its quagmire of textual problems.
For a dramatist with at least three canonically important works (The Dutch Courtesan, The Malcontent, and Antonio's Revenge) contemporary critics have been especially chary of addressing John Marston's plays.
The six-foot McTeer left us breathless as the vivacious single mom in Tumbleweeds, a hyperkinetic Nora in an imported London stage version of A Doll's House, and a malcontent hausfrau in The King Is Alive.
3) The Malcontent (1603), however, despite its status as Marston's best known play, has received virtually no attention along these lines; rather, critics have generally focused on its brilliant exploration of role-play and its closely-related doubleness of theme, mood, and structure.
Plays discussed include Lyly's Endymion, Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay, Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest, Marston's The Malcontent, Middleton's Michaelmas Term, Jonson's Bartholomew Fair, Shirley's The Lady of Ple asure, and Brome's A Jovial Crew.
The dictionary defines a malcontent as a person "dissatisfied with the existing government, administration, system, etc.
English dramatist, one of the most vigorous satirists of the Shakespearean era, whose best-known work is The Malcontent (1604), in which he rails at the iniquities of a lascivious court.
However, McKay's malcontent is exiled and disgraced within a "cultured hell"; he is not thrown out, but contained.
An inconsistent and dissolute malcontent, he nevertheless showed considerable ability as a commander and administrator.
In his best work, The Malcontent (1604) and The Dutch Courtezan, his satiric power is couched in a dramatic structure that, if not extraordinary, is at least adequate.