movement

(redirected from mandibular movement)
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movement

(Activity), noun campaign, cause, mass movement, motion, operation, principle, series of actions directed towards a particular end, undertaking

movement

(Progress), noun action, agitation, circulation, course, denomination, effort, great cause, interest, issue, measure, outflow, performance, removal, shift, step, stir, stride, transition, transmittal, traveling

movement

(Shipment), noun cartage, conveyance, transit, transportation
See also: activity, band, campaign, circulation, course, denomination, dispatch, operation, outflow, progress, transition, transmittal
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Swallowing, speech, mandibular movements, mastication, and control of saliva, respiration, and psychic functioning are adversely affected by radical mandibular surgery.
Biondi AM: Determination of range of mandibular movements in adults without tempo- romandibular disorders.
Treatment objective was to free the contact mandibular movements in all eccentric directions by occlusal equilibration as described by Glickma and Kersteins ICAGD techniqu.
It is assumed that chewing such a food required lower masticatory forces and wide lateral mandibular movements.
3) It can occur unilaterally or bilaterally and may result in dysphagia, headache, change in voice, and a sensation of hypersalivation, in addition to the characteristic intense pain within the throat and tongue, which is commonly stimulated by cervical or mandibular movements.
All the mandibular movements were normal except the lower lip and adjacent soft tissues which were falling behind the upper dentition making an incompetent lip seal during functions.
Orthodontic Implications of Growth and Differently Enabled Mandibular Movements for the Temporomandibular Joint.
Other chapters in this part cover alignment and occlusion of the dentition, the mechanics of mandibular movements, the criteria for optimal functional occlusion, and the determining factors for occlusal morphology.
In order to achieve good food manipulation and transport, tongue and other tissue movements must be facilitated during mandibular movements for repositioning of mandibular teeth during sequential chewing strokes, (10) suggesting that wide, bilateral chewing cycles are related to better masticatory performance.
To understand this, it is sufficient to remember that when we examine a TMJ we should always examine the contralateral because an alteration affects this one too, in a certain way, as well as, the muscles involved in the mandibular movements, teeth and periodont and sometimes even the structures of the cervical region (Alves & Candido, 2007).