Manifesto

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MANIFESTO. A solemn declaration, by the constituted authorities of a nation, which contains the reasons for its public acts towards another.
     2. On the declaration of war, a manifesto is usually issued in which the nation declaring the war, states the reasons for so doing. Vattel, liv. 3, c. 4, Sec. 64; Wolff, Sec. 1187. See Anti-Manifesto.

References in classic literature ?
The manifesto was signed with great reluctance by Messrs.
Three days after the manifesto of President Barbicane $4,000,000 were paid into the different towns of the Union.
Drawing a parallel between manifestos of the BJP and the Congress, Surjewala said that there was a contest between "plethoras of fake promises versus support of Nyay."
What is the main skepticism around such manifestos?
'Manifestos matter and if governments feel they can forget them when they are in power, should voters ignore all election promises by parties because they are all purely decorative?' he asked.
Though several political parties have disability wings none of the other parties mentioned them in their manifestos.
ISLAMABAD -- The three major political parties Pakistan People's Party, Pakistan Muslim League-N and Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf have unveiled their manifestos.
POLITICAL parties' manifestos are supposed to offer a road map giving travel directions, while also providing an analysis of the situation at hand and taking into account voter preferences.
The Institute for Policy Reforms (IPR) Tuesday released a comprehensive study on the extent to which political parties deliver on the promises made in their manifestos.
ISLAMABAD: Major political parties in the country have made only a passing reference to school education reforms in their manifestos, a local media outlet on Saturday.
Similarly, former Prime Minister and PPP Chairperson Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto had announced six party manifestos in her life.
Patrolling the rows of desks in her classroom, she delivers an earnest monologue comprising various manifestos from the world of cinema.