march


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References in classic literature ?
`Then you should say what you mean,' the March Hare went on.
`You might just as well say,' added the March Hare, `that "I like what I get" is the same thing as "I get what I like"!'
March looked at the low-browed crag overhanging the green slope and nodded.
March automatically put out his hand in one futile gesture, as if to catch a falling tea-cup in a drawing-room.
All that day the serjeant and the young soldier marched together; and the former, who was an arch fellow, told the latter many entertaining stories of his campaigns, though in reality he had never made any; for he was but lately come into the service, and had, by his own dexterity, so well ingratiated himself with his officers, that he had promoted himself to a halberd; chiefly indeed by his merit in recruiting, in which he was most excellently well skilled.
When the final news arrived that the campaign was opened, and the troops were to march, Rawdon's gravity became such that Becky rallied him about it in a manner which rather hurt the feelings of the Guardsman.
"I tell you what you can do," the Captain replied, coming up to the bed; "we march in a quarter of an hour, Sedley, and neither George nor I may ever come back.
Those performances which had been witnessed by his fellows marched now in wide purple and gold, having various deflections.
As he marched along the little branch-hung roadway among his prattling companions this vision of cruelty brooded over him.
March, crossing out the third spoiled sentence in her letter.
March lost his property in trying to help an unfortunate friend, the two oldest girls begged to be allowed to do something toward their own support, at least.
The Chief of the Whimsies now marched his false-headed forces into the tunnel.