mare clausum


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

mare clausum

a sea coming under the jurisdiction of one nation and closed to all others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although published earlier than Mare Clausum, Mare Liberum did not gain traction until much later when the rest of Europe began to engage in trade.
...," (132) The history of mare clausum casts a long shadow over
(1584-1654), devoted several chapters of Mare Clausum (1635) 'to
Es asi que, por lo menos, desde el siglo XVII el derecho del mar ha estado caracterizado por la friccion de dos doctrinas contrapuestas y extremas: la libertad de los mares por un lado (basada en la nocion de la alta mar o mar libre, llamada tambien Mare Liberum) y, por el otro, la autoridad nacional sobre ellos (basada en la nocion del mar territorial o de aguas sujetas a la soberania territorial del Estado ribereno, llamada tambien Mare Clausum) (9).
La segunda doctrina, planteada entre otros por John Selden en su trabajo Mare Clausum (1618) (16), sostiene que los Estados estan facultados para reclamar y ejercer autoridad exclusiva (jurisdiccion) sobre una determinada porcion del mar, que en algunas ocasiones incluia la clausura o el cierre del mar o de partes de el.
John Milton referred to him as "the chief of learned men reputed in this land." Paul Christianson has now provided us with a systematic and comprehensive exposition of Selden's legal, political, and historical thought between the appearance of Jani Anglorum (1610) and the publication of Mare Clausum (1635), his last work of constitutional history.
Such an argument was a novelty in seventeenth-century England, at least until it found its first major expression in Selden's Mare Clausum (c.
Equally unknown is Mare clausum, Haydn's unfinished setting of a patriotic ode by Selden.
English and Dutch writers formulated the language of interest in politics, though their positions might be diametrically opposed, as when John Selden opposed Grotius's Mare liberum with an argument on behalf of Mare clausum. Since Tuck shows so much interest in jurists, it might have repaid his efforts to look at such trans-European writers as Alberigo Gentili, an Italian Protestant lawyer active in England, or at the English Romanist Sir Arthur Duck (currently undergoing a mild revival in Germany).
While Selden's historical perspective allowed for shifts in the common law over time, sovereignty remained with the king-in-parliament: "the law of England shifted, but the power that made the law was always its reception by the English and their king." Drawing upon Mare Clausum (163 5) as "the best example Selden gave of what his theories meant," Cromartie interprets Selden as strongly tied to contract as the binding force in state formation (p.