Mark


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mark

n. 1) an "X" made by a person who is illiterate or too weak to sign his/her full name, used in the expression "His Mark," or "Her Mark." On the rare occasion that this occurs, the "X" should be within or next to a notation such as "Theresa Testator, her mark." If the mark is intended as a signature to a will it should be formally witnessed (as signatures are) to make the will valid. (See: will)

MARK. This term has several acceptations. 1. It is a sign traced on paper or parchment, which stands in the place of a signature, usually made by persons who cannot write. 2 Cart. R. 324; M. & M. 516; 12 Pet. 150; 7 Bing. 457; 2 Ves. 455; 1 V. & B. 362; 1 Ves., jr. 11. A mark is now held to be a good signature, though the party was able to write. 8 Ad. & El. 94; 3 Nev. & Per. 228; 3 Curt. 752; 5 John. 144. Vide Subscription.
     2.-2. It is the sign, writing or ticket put upon manufactured goods to distinguish them from others. Poph. R. 144; 3 B & C. 541; 2 Atk. R. 485; 2 V. & B. 218; 3 M. & C. 1; Ed. Inj. 814. Vide Trade Marks.
     3.-3. Mark or marc, denotes a weight used in several parts of Europe, and for several commodities, especially gold and silver. When gold and silver are sold by the mark, it is divided into twenty-four carats.
     4.-4. Mark is also in England a money of accounts, and in some other countries a coin. The English marc is two-thirds of a pound sterling, or 13s. 4d., and the Scotch mark is of equal value in Scotch money of account. Ency. Amer. h.t.

References in classic literature ?
``My grandsire,'' said Hubert, ``drew a good bow at the battle of Hastings, and never shot at such a mark in his life and neither will I.
``Sirrah Locksley, do thou shoot; but, if thou hittest such a mark, I will say thou art the first man ever did so.
A roar of applause burst from the crossbowmen; but at the instant that the bolt struck its mark old Johnston, who had stood listlessly with arrow on string, bent his bow and sped a shaft through the body of the falcon.
"It is over the fifth!" cried a Gascon loudly, and a comrade came running with waving arms to say that the bolt had pitched eight paces beyond the mark of the five hundred.
"We've got to hitch to windward of that Mark Boat somehow," George cried.
The Mark Boat was below and a little to the sou'west of us, fluctuating in the centre of her distraught galaxy.
His first object was to learn his limits, round which he would pace, occasionally freshening, with a blow of his axe, the marks on the boundary trees; and then he would proceed, with an air of great deliberation, to the centre of his premises, and, throwing aside his superfluous garments, measure, with a knowing eye, one or two of the nearest trees that were towering apparently into the very clouds as he gazed upward.
"If we could get a breed of gals that didn't care, now, for their young uns," said Marks; "tell ye, I think 't would be
'bout the greatest mod'rn improvement I knows on,"--and Marks patronized his joke by a quiet introductory sniggle.
While I turn my back now, I beg that several persons will be so good as to pass their fingers through their hair, and then press them upon one of the panes of the window near the jury, and that among them the accused may set THEIR finger marks. Also, I beg that these experimenters, or others, will set their fingers upon another pane, and add again the marks of the accused, but not placing them in the same order or relation to the other signatures as before--for, by one chance in a million, a person might happen upon the right marks by pure guesswork, ONCE, therefore I wish to be tested twice."
Here are A's finger marks, taken at the age of five months.
After fourteen thousand generations, six new species, marked by the letters n14 to z14, are supposed to have been produced.