married life


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References in classic literature ?
Why, just before you came in Amy said they'd never had a quarrel in the whole of their married life. You know Amy.
He had pictured each of those young ladies as almost all honest-hearted young men do, that is, as a possible wife, adapting her in his imagination to all the conditions of married life: a white dressing gown, his wife at the tea table, his wife's carriage, little ones, Mamma and Papa, their relations to her, and so on- and these pictures of the future had given him pleasure.
In fact, a chill tremor went through me as I realised that, to all intent, I was at length respectably settled down, with quite a considerable retrospect of happy married life. To come to a decision is always to bring something to an end.
Harmon Andrews told me when I came home that I wouldn't likely find married life as much better than teaching as I expected.
Karnegie wished to know whether after twenty years of married life, she was considered to be not worth answering by her own husband.
Never, in the weeks of their married life, had Billy found her dowdy, or harshly irritable, or lethargic.
His mother had been in her youth a brilliant society woman, who had had during her married life, and still more afterwards, many love affairs notorious in the whole fashionable world.
During our married life she continued to divide her time and strength between our home and the work for the school.
Like most other young matrons, Meg began her married life with the determination to be a model housekeeper.
Such experiences as the foregoing were not uncommon in her married life. They seemed never before to have weighed much against the abundance of her husband's kindness and a uniform devotion which had come to be tacit and self-understood.
And it was all very nice - the large, sunny room; his deep, easy-chair in a bow window, with pillows and a footstool; the quiet, watchful care of the elderly, gentle woman who had borne him five children, and had not, perhaps, lived with him more than five full years out of the thirty or so of their married life. There was also another woman there in a plain black dress, quite gray-haired, sitting very erect on her chair with some sewing, from which she snatched side-glances in his direction, and uttering not a single word during all the time of my call.
My tale draws to its close: one word respecting my experience of married life, and one brief glance at the fortunes of those whose names have most frequently recurred in this narrative, and I have done.