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CELL. A small room in a prison. See Dungeon.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
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Several investigators have revealed that the nanostructure influences the adhesion, differentiation, and migration of bone marrow cells significantly [9-12] and that the fates of cells on NT arrays are size dependent [9, 13, 14], while the optimal diameter is still controversial.
At present, whether or not FA can induce the increase of micronucleus rate in animal cells is still controversial.5 It was reported that short time inhalation of FA can induce the increase of micronucleus rate in bone marrow cells of exposed mice.6-8 Our recent studies showed that the micronucleus rate of bone marrow cells in the experimental mice was increased by acute oral administration of FA.9 In the present study, the male mice were chronically exposed to FA through inhalation.
Cleveland Clinic cardiologist Marc Penn, MD, PhD, a leading researcher in stem cell therapy, says he's confident that heart patients around the world could start to experience improved heart function triggered by bone marrow cells harvested from their own bodies.
During follow-up, LVEF increased by an average of 3% over baseline in 92 evaluable control patients and by an average of 5.5% in 95 evaluable patients who received bone marrow cells, a statistically significant effect for the study's primary end point, Dr.
Standard chemotherapy destroys the malignant cells but is also toxic to normal marrow cells, thus limiting the dose of the drugs that can safely be given.
"The importance of the present study is that it shows that intracoronary delivery of bone marrow cells improves function and flow in patients with old myocardial infarction.
Washington, June 30 (ANI): A new study has found that an extract derived from bone marrow cells is as effective as therapy using bone marrow stem cells for improving cardiac function after a heart attack.
"We may actually be able to use a person's own bone marrow cells and get them to differentiate into [liver cells} and then transplant them back into [the person's] own liver without having to go through the trauma of a liver transplant," said Bryon Petersen of the University of Pittsburgh, Penn.
The findings, published on Wednesday, in the journal Blood show that healthy bone marrow cells were prematurely aged by cancer cells around them.
"This kind of transplantation is done with the purpose of allowing the patient to tolerate a mega dose of treatment without having an irreversible damage of his bone marrow cells.
In addition, the bone marrow cells do not transplant well.