Masculine

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MASCULINE. That which belongs to the male sex.
     2. The masculine sometimes includes the feminine, vide an example under the article Man, and see also the articles Gender, Worthiest of blood; Poth. Intr. au titre 16, des Testamens et Donations Testamentaires, n. 170; Ayl, Pand. 57; 4 C. & P. 216; S. C. 19 E. C. L. R. 551 3 Fred. Code, pr. 1, b. 1, t. 4, s. 3; 3 Brev. R. 9.

References in periodicals archive ?
There were different masculinities, there were hierarchical relationships, there was contestation, and there were dilemmas about how hegemony was maintained in changing economic circumstances.
Entre dois mundos" projects what might be called a changing mood of masculinity in Brazil, that is, a growing resistance to normative hegemonic forms of masculinity that have depended upon the exclusion and oppression of women and subordinate masculinities.
Masculinities, identity and the politics of essentialism: A social constructionist critique of the men's movement.
From Connell's (1987) work, it is clear that hegemonic masculinity is an ideal form or a model of masculinity that is socially and historically constructed in relation to subordinated masculinities and in relation to femininities.
It has been suggested that hegemonic masculinity has not existed in isolation (Allen, 2007), and that it is constructed, not only in relation to femininity, but also in relation to subordinated and marginalised masculinities (Tereskinas, 2007).
ZW and RM are identifiable as an example of both producing and reproducing what Warner and Connell maintain are heteronormative, hegemonic masculinities (Connell, 'The Social Organisation of Masculinity' 30; Warner, 42) and lend themselves to feminist critiques on their forms of sexual objectification of women as found in similar magazines (e.
The second section investigates multiple masculinities throughout the regions of Mexico from the "Golden Age" of cinema during the early twentieth century up to the charros gays or "gay cowboys" of the early 2000s.
Kippola begins by challenging the notion that there was simply 'one American masculine model' (2), but he wisely sets boundaries on his study, taking up just white, popular masculinities on the American stage.
Burke's Masculinities and Other Hopeless Causes at an All-Boys Catholic School, masculinity is closely examined in a single-gendered, religious environment.
Making it Like a Man: Canadian Masculinities in Practice (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier Press 2011)
Marginal groups, therefore, built, precisely on the basis of these characteristics, concepts of masculinity dominant to the group, but marginal to the hegemonic model, which not only can not aspire to be part of it, because of their cultural characteristics--although, like other subordinate masculinities benefit of the patriarchal dividend, the tangible or intangible benefits coming from the action of hegemonic masculinity to the outside--but built in opposition to it, rejecting or exasperating some of its traits.