master


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Master

An individual who hires employees or servants to perform services and who directs the manner in which such services are performed.A court officer appointed by a judge to perform such jobs as examining witnesses, taking testimony, computing damages, or taking oaths, affidavits, or acknowledgments of deeds.

A master makes a report of his or her findings to the judge so a decree can be formulated. A master in chancery was an officer in Chancery Court in England. In the U. S. these duties may be rendered by a court clerk, commissioner, auditor, or referee.

master

n. 1) employer, in the area of law known as "master and servant," which more properly should be called employer and employee. 2) a person, supposedly with special expertise, appointed by a judge to investigate a problem (such as whether a parent's home is appropriate for child visitation) and report back to the judge his/her findings and recommendation. (See: master and servant, employment, respondeat superior)

master

adjective arch, authoritative, capital, central, chief, commanding, controlling, crowning, dictating, eminent, foremost, governing, great, head, hegemonic, hegemonical, incomparable, influential, leading, main, most important, outstanding, paramount, predominating, prepotent, prevailing, prevalent, primary, prime, recognized, regnant, reigning, ruling, sovereign, star, stellar, supereminent, supreme, top-flight, well-known
Associated concepts: agency, master and servant
See also: absolute, apprehend, attain, command, comprehend, construe, defeat, director, dominant, dominate, employer, expert, gain, govern, impose, manage, mastermind, moderate, overcome, oversee, overthrow, overwhelm, paramount, pass, pedagogue, perceive, predominate, prevail, principal, professional, proprietor, remember, repress, rule, sovereign, specialist, subdue, subject, subjugate, succeed, superintendent, surmount, understand

master

1 a nearly obsolete term for an EMPLOYER under a contract of employment in the sense of service rather than for services. The law was treated under the title ‘master and servant’ but is now usually collected under the title ‘employment law’, which includes much to do with trade unions. See EMPLOYMENT, UNFAIR DISMISSAL.
2 an officer of the Supreme Court of Judicature subordinate to a judge.

MASTER. This word has several meanings. 1. Master is one who has control over a servant or apprentice. A master stands in relation to his apprentices, in loco parentis, and is bound to fulfill that relation, which the law generally enforces. He is also entitled to be obeyed by his apprentices, as if they were his children. Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.
     2.-2. Master is one who is employed in teaching children, known generally as a schoolmaster; as to his powers, see Correction.
     3.-3. Master is the name of an officer: as, the ship Benjamin Franklin, whereof A B is master; the master of the rolls; master in chancery, &c.
     4.-4. By master is also understood a principal who employs another to perform some act or do something for him. The law having adopted the maxim of the civil law, qui facit per alium facit per se; the agent is but an instrument, and the master is civilly responsible for the act of his agent, as if it were his own, when he either commands him to do an act, or puts him in a condition, of which such act is a result, or by the absence of due care and control, either previously in the choice of his agent, or immediately in the act itself, negligently suffers him to do an injury. Story, Ag. Sec. 454, note; Noy's Max. c. 44; Salk. 282; 1 East. R. 106; 1 Bos. & Pul. 404; 2 H. Bl. 267; 5 Barn. & Cr. 547; 2 Taunt. R. 314; 4 Taunt. R. 649; Mass. 364, 385; 17 Mass. 479, 509; 1 Pick. 47 5; 4 Watts, 222; 2 Harr. & Gill., 316; 6 Cowen, 189; 8 Pick. 23; 5 Munf. 483. Vide Agent; Agency; Driver; Servant.

References in classic literature ?
Jacques Charmolue recalled him wholly to a sense of reality by addressing to him this question: "Come, now, master, when will you come to aid me in making gold?
In fact, master," he replied, with a respectful smile, "all great philosophers have their familiar animal.
I say, this is a pretty warm reception for a poor lone wolf from the Arctic," the master said, while White Fang calmed down under his caressing hand.
Some of these stood respectfully at a distance; but two of them, women, perpetrated the hostile act of clutching the master around the neck.
Then White Fang, to show his friendship, will have to be chief mourner at the funeral," laughed the master.
At this point Master Pedro came up in quest of Don Quixote, to tell him the show was now ready and to come and see it, for it was worth seeing.
But enough of that for the present; let us go and see Master Pedro's show, for I am sure there must be something novel in it.
said Master Pedro; "this show of mine has sixty thousand novel things in it; let me tell you, Senor Don Quixote, it is one of the best-worth-seeing things in the world this day; but operibus credite et non verbis, and now let's get to work, for it is growing late, and we have a great deal to do and to say and show.
My master has disposed of them already,'' said Gurth.
Barely,'' said Gurth, though the sum demanded was more reasonable than he expected, ``and it will leave my master nigh penniless.
Aunt Hester went out one night,-- where or for what I do not know,--and happened to be absent when my master desired her presence.
If the lineal descendants of Ham are alone to be scriptur- ally enslaved, it is certain that slavery at the south must soon become unscriptural; for thousands are ushered into the world, annually, who, like myself, owe their existence to white fathers, and those fa- thers most frequently their own masters.